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Which route/salary

Discussion in 'Staffroom' started by Mr 1984, 28 Jan 2017.

  1. Mr 1984

    Mr 1984 Thread Starter New Member

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    So as mentioned before I'm looking to get into teaching and would like to work in thailand. I have a few options. Your opinions/advice would be appreciated.
    1) come to Thailand next near complete a CELTA and look for a job locally.
    2.) complete a PGCE in the uk, teach in the uk for a few years then apply for jobs in the uk.
    3.) option 1 for a year. During this period i can see if I'm suited to living in Thailand n experience what teaching there is like. I will also search for jobs in other areas which I am qualified (a long shot but possible). If I fail to secure a job that pays 80,000+(Most likely non teaching) I will return home and pursue option 2.
    Unfortunately, as in most things my options relate to money. I need enough to have a good lifestyle and ultimately prepare for retirement. As I understand it with option 1 I will earn around 40,000 per month teaching in bkk? Can anyone inform me what I'd be looking at with option 2. I've heard around 100,000 is this correct?
    Which option would you go with?
    Many thanks
     
  2. fred flintstone

    fred flintstone Well-Known Member

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    Do the second option. It''ll open up more options with better pay down the road. 80K although not impossible is a pretty slim chance starting out.
     
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  3. IntEdSource

    IntEdSource Member

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    I agree entirely with Fred. Netting that amount solely with a CELTA and no teaching experience would be highly difficult. More importantly, it would provide few opportunities to reach or exceed that amount.

    The second route does not mean you have to remain in the UK. After you earn your teaching qualification and a few years of experience, you'll be in a good position to apply for openings at international schools in Thailand. The pay at these schools varies dramatically. At a smaller tier 3 school it may be as low as 45,000 baht/month up to a maximum of 80,000 to 90,000 at the top of their scales. The tier 2 schools have an even larger range: anywhere between 60,000 to 150,000 baht/month, plus other benefits. A very small number of tier 1 schools (ISB, BPS and NIST) all have scales that begin around 150,000 baht/month and top out far above that. They also provide very generous benefits packages.

    Since most of the upper tier 2 and tier 1 schools tend to hire overseas (though all will hire some teachers from within Thailand), including through the London Search Associates fair, your best option would be to build up experience in the UK, and possibly at an international school elsewhere, and then apply for some of the better schools through that fair.
     
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  4. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    I would chose this option. More options inside and outside Thailand.
     
  5. muppetminder

    muppetminder Active Member

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    40k doubt it. Maybe after your third year, jumping jobs and burning waivers.

    Something about the post seems trollish. I also have a peculiar feeling if the OP and questions are real, he has no BA. My two satang.
     
  6. muppetminder

    muppetminder Active Member

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    Decent jobs at Intl schools are slim to none but at least you'll have the correct flag behind you.

    How many top tier schools paying 100k a month in BKK? Not many, especially if you're hired in country. 80 max is my guess.

    By the time you complete option 2 the entire game will have changed as well.
     
  7. Wangsuda

    Wangsuda Nonentity Staff Member

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    I would recommend doing some serious research before you come. Those "other" options you seem to think you have in order to make 80k+ might not exist, due to current labor laws. Decide what you want to do and carefully research the job's availability BEFORE coming.
     
  8. Mister T

    Mister T Retired, fat and happy

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    Option 2 for certain, goal posts keep moving here and this option will give you a more secure start.
     
  9. archlord

    archlord Member

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    What labor laws are you speaking of?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
  10. IntEdSource

    IntEdSource Member

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    As of this year, approximately 20 of the licensed international schools in Thailand (of around 170) have salary scales that start around 80,000 for a beginning teacher (with no experience) and 35-40 have pay scales that extend above 100,000/month. (These are not differentiated for in-country versus out-of-country hires. It applies to both.) It isn't that uncommon anymore, as the established schools have had to raise their pay and benefits due to the increased competition.

    It's also highly probable that this trend will continue for the foreseeable future. The peak growth for international schools was in the decade following the opening of those schools to Thai citizens (1992-2002). However, the year-on-year growth over the last few years has still averaged 4-6%. Several more (both new ones and new campuses of existing schools) are set to open this year and next year, and the demand is still high enough for those institutions to turn a profit.

    The bottom line is that the demand for qualified teachers will correspondingly remain high. As long as the OP maps out his career path, actively works to develop his CV and aims to be recruited before arrival, it would not a long shot to get a decent-paying position.
     
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  11. Mr 1984

    Mr 1984 Thread Starter New Member

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    Why would someone spend time trolling asking such questions. What would i be getting from that. You are way off the mark my friend
     
  12. macos11

    macos11 Member

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    I was in a somewhat similar situation some years ago. I wanted to live and work in Thailand. I had the option to get a Master's in the field I was studying (not teaching) and try to find work related to that in Thailand. However, it would not have been easy and I might have just ended up teaching without proper qualifications.

    I opted for option 2). I got a Master's in education in a field related to what I was studying before. Taught in my home country full time for a year and had the occasional teaching gig at the uni and short subs at other schools.

    I traveled to Thailand and started job hunting. Sent out emails to many international schools, got a few job offers from which I chose the best one. I couldn't be happier at the school. I work with professionals that care for the students and administration that listens to the teachers. The pay starts at 100k+ so I'm not bothered to be at the bottom of the pay scale.

    In hindsight I probably should have applied before coming to Thailand, in order to have better chances for landing a good job. However, I am very happy with the end result.

    Go for option 2. Your future self will be very grateful!
     
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  13. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Labour has a huge set of rules for companies who want to employ foreigners. And then there's a list of prohibited occupations for foreigners.

    Immigration has minimum wage rules depending on nationality.
     
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  14. Mr 1984

    Mr 1984 Thread Starter New Member

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    I'm considering teaching history, RE or PE. Which do you think will serve me best?
    Thanks
     
  15. fred flintstone

    fred flintstone Well-Known Member

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    the one you enjoy the most,
     
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