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What is your opinion of cars with or without airbags?

Discussion in 'Residing in Thailand' started by Garden, 26 Nov 2016.

  1. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    Stamp, that look like you're doing 62 +.....great to hear that nothing happened to you.

    Cars in the West usually have a sensor telling the computer if there's weight on the passenger's seat.

    Unbelievable that it ripped the whole front wheel with ball joints and other parts off.

    What did the other car look like???? Drive safe. :lmao
     
  2. SageAdvice

    SageAdvice Well-Known Member

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    I know, I know...what is wrong with this place?!:smiling
     
  3. SageAdvice

    SageAdvice Well-Known Member

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    You might want to get your ears checked :smiling.
     
  4. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    Or cleaned with a needle at my barber shop? :angry3
     
  5. SageAdvice

    SageAdvice Well-Known Member

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    Maybe you suffer from aural airbag deployment... :smiling.
     
  6. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

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    That, Sirchai, is absolutely correct. My humble Cruze was making a strange noise. The dealer mechanic told us that a three day stay was needed. We said we would return in the morrow. We did not. We sought a second opinion. Said second opinion changed the fan belt, said noise was vanished.
     
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  7. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    It's always a belt when the noise comes and goes. Good to hear that the other place didn't get your cash.

    You'd have a new engine now.......and a lot less money. If I were you, I'd do my best to make advertisement for them. Have a great one.

    P.S. Please feel free to ask for advice if you encounter something similar next time.
     
  8. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

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    so long as the advice is something other than motorised transport, I will seek your wisdom. Your track record is.. let's say.. sub par with safety:sad
     
  9. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Well-Known Member

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    I find myself in the unlikely position of defending Thai auto mechanics.

    I am not a mechanic, and I confess that I judged the maintenance at my Honda dealer by the impressive cleanliness of the shop, how they seemed to check everything carefully (which could have been fake), how they kept good records (which could just have been eyewash), how I watched them work the entire time (they could have been acting), how I never had a problem with my car (I could have been lucky), and how one mechanic in the shop is my wife's cousin and all the guy has done in his life is work on cars (which could be some strange charade), and I know he is qualified to do his job because he graduated from wrench-and-nut school, the one I taught at as a guest lecturer, which was not astrophysics (maybe his twin attended, you never know, the twin no one knew he had, gullible us).

    I concede. Those guys have a screw loose and are probably unqualified to do their jobs. In fact, unsafe.

    Nah, just kidding. I think a mechanic at big dealership should be able to solve all basic problems and some unusual ones for a car of the dealership's make. Is that too much to believe in? Are we going to say that they cannot fix a car because they are Thai? I think not. General automobile maintenance at big dealerships is probably satisfactory, probably standardized. Maintenance for unusual makes and models at any old shop would be a totally different story.

    Being qualified to do one's job is an important part of life.

    Back on target: it really is important to take safety into consideration in Thailand because, for whatever reasons, the roads are really dangerous. That means having airbags and taking some time to learn the details of car and motorcycle safety, something which some members obviously know about (Hey_Ewe and Sirchai). I am very aware of safety because I saw (on Facebook) and heard about so many appalling accidents in my former hometown in Isaan.
     
    Last edited: 1 Dec 2016
  10. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Well-Known Member

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    [Sounds pretty much like a Thai-English teacher's command in English is way better than those of the so-called " native English speaking teachers."]


    This is an example of a howler.

    Feel the love.
     
    Last edited: 1 Dec 2016
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  11. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    You caught me in the act and I'm really ashamed of myself. :go10 I believe that there're plenty of good mechanics who do a fantastic job and I'd never dare to throw all in the same pot.

    I've made quite a few strange experiences at Mitsubishi Sisaket ( but also at other places) and it was always electric/electronic where they usually pass. The foreman for example told me that a solenoid that opens a valve at the exhaust system would be broken.

    I connected it with plus and minus and showed him that it worked and you could hear the clicking noise. But he still thought that the valve would be the problem and they ordered one.

    When it finally arrived and they put the new part in, nothing changed. The vacuum tubes weren't connected the way they should have been. Using some common sense finally helped me to find the problem without paying a few thousand baht for a new solenoid.

    But I currently experience something that's really annoying. Our son "studying electronics" at the local technical college in his third year.

    He wanted that and I gave him the freedom to choose. But it turned out that it was the wrong decision and almost three years of his life wasted for something I can't even call studying.

    He knows nothing about electronics, or electric. He wants to go to another school next year and become a cop but being already 18 isn't really in his favor.

    His new teacher introduced himself by telling them for a few hours that he's wearing the same shirt for three to four days in a roll because he's too lazy to wash it.

    His English teacher's asking him how to pronounce certain words and that goes on and on and on.

    Our son couldn't even change a light bulb without getting electrocuted.....I guess the car mechanic guys there experience a similar "quality education" from teachers who're always too busy to come to school.

    When I still had my big bike I couldn't see our mechanic holding a wire/cable against the ground to check if there's electricity and finally gave him a voltmeter with instructions how to use it.

    A week later he went back to his technique and I gave up. Can't change the system, sorry. :aloof
     
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  12. Garden

    Garden Thread Starter Much ado about nothing

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    I bought this Frod (sic) Ranger yesterday. I think it is a Mazda in disguise manufactured in their combined plant in Rayong, Thailand, but it is also fun to drive; plus my dad used to work for a Ford dealership for all his life. So, definitely a bit of emotion in my buying decision. Screenshot.png

    I know next to nothing about cars.
    My new-secondhand car has some curious buttons and switches.
    What is RFW? And the red switch next to it looks dangerous. What does it do?
    RFW and red switch.jpg


    And my car has a second (!) gear stick with hieroglyphic markings on it. My wife and me have to eventually learn all this. I did some YouTube research, but I don't get it.
    Should I drive in 4L or N or whatnot?
    W4Dstick.jpg

    When I bought the car yesterday, it was all explained to me, like it is all obvious.
    I am happy with the car, because it is fun to drive, but I need some ELI5 "Explain like I am 5 years old" regarding those switches and gears.

    Sorry for the naive post and I don't know how to adjust the image size in this post, too.

    Screenshot.png
     
  13. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

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    the car looks lovely, rfw or really fun women was an optional add on for the vehicle. Pressed, the car will attract some wild and fun girls
     
  14. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    rfw = remote free wheeling
    2H = normal 2-wheel drive
    4H = normal 4-wheel drive
    4L= heavy 4-wheel drive. Best power and traction engagement. Car won't go faster than about 80 km/h in gear 5.
     
  15. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    You've to be very careful with that button. Generally, never engage. Very dangerous. That's why it's red.
     

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