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What are the best schools?

Discussion in 'Schools you want to talk about' started by Matthew, 18 Dec 2010.

  1. Matthew

    Matthew Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    What schools have a good thing going according to/among the readers here? By experience or by reputation. Of course no school is perfect, especially in the LOS. But what schools tend to defy the sinkhole of quality? Which schools have you/do you enjoy working at and/or see some hope for academically/professionally?

    I'd say Satit Ramkhamhaeng is a solid place. You really could do worse. It might not have the size/money/history of some of the other Satits, but it looks like it's trying to catch up a bit. I worked there for a year and a half and I thought the core staff there really did their best. Impressive, especially considering you're in the shadow of other schools and a uni ED department that thinks but does not know how to do much.

    I also taught at AUA. I taught at the branch near Ram. Also for about a year and a half. This branch used to burst at the seems with students. They've had their issues, but generally the place is nice. Location is good, students form a nice little community there. Bucolic view of the klong. Just kidding about that last bit. As a teacher, you could do much worse than AUA Hua Mark. Can't say I liked their change from Interchange to Hemispheres as the main textbook, but what can you do.
     
  2. aging one

    aging one slip sliding away

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    AUA will always be semi solid I think. Its a pity it has become Thai run though. Cut my teeth there and enjoyed it. I am reasonably happy with my kids school. The EP part I would give a B+ it would be higher if not for teacher turnover. A good company BFITS runs it and they use good McGraw Hill textbooks to the tune of 2,000 baht each which I am happy to pay. The Thai side however is hopeless, and inept. Some try but its really sad. Which of the courses my daughters take will be of value in the future? Thai social studies, Buddhism, Thai History, Thai, PE which is not PE, and some weird subject where they learn to do things around the house. Basic Electronics seems cool, and they love woodwork. But come on what use are these classes if you are going to university in America?
    Wont name the school now but its a government school in Prathum Thani, in all honesty the best government school in the province.
     
  3. bird

    bird Member

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    As far as private institutions like AUA, ECC, BCC, etc. are concerned, I believe it really depends on the teachers working there, at the moment. Correct me if I'm wrong, but it seems to me that teachers come and go at those schools.

    Satit prathom in Ayutthaya has never had a good or bad reputation during the time that I've lived here, but Satit Mathayom is another story. 90% of the students I've had the pleasure of having as private students are just amazing. Learn really fast, always pay attention. Basically very easy to teach!

    I'd say the best high school in Ayutthaya must be Satit.
     
  4. crew

    crew Faber College Member

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    There's a school here on Phuket called Phuket Satrii. Its EP is stacked with very good and dedicated teachers. They've all been there for ages and IMO, that goes a long way in terms of identifying a quality place to work. I hope the sts are as satisfied with their teachers as the teachers are satisfied with the school.
     
  5. slamb

    slamb Active Member

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    I'd agree that the (foreign) teachers, particularly the ones 'in charge', at the school make it a nice, or not, environment to work in. At our school we've got a few been in Thailand long time, desperate, degree-less, TR visa 'tards who are supposed to facilitate communication between us & the Thai admin but just spend their time feathering their own nests & picking their next unfortunate bullying victim.

    Love the Thai admin (bless 'em), love the Thai teachers, love the students; despise the 'tards. :wink2:
     
  6. Tonyja

    Tonyja Well-Known Member

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    I think there's those types at a lot of schools.
     
  7. wjblaney

    wjblaney New Member

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    I think the best schools must be those: 1) that have a month vacation in Oct and 2 1/2 months in March, April and half of May (that's true where i work: MaechaiWittayakom) 2) pay the teachers for all 12 months (that's not true where i work) 3) offer automatic contract renewals plus raises (not true at my school) 4) understand that teachers 'have a life' and make it convenient to get to/from school (provide transportation, e.g. car pooling) and end classes by 3 o'clock :smile2: (i have neither of those perks).

    Any schools like that?
     
  8. Wangsuda

    Wangsuda Nonentity Staff Member

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    While that may be best for you, what about the students? My son's prathom school is quite good, with a 10-1 student/teacher ratio, an optional after-school program, and teachers who have been there for several years. His textbooks are age-appropriate and look engaging. I receive a daily progress report on my son's work. Now I do pay a mint for this, but it is well worth it.
     
  9. ramses

    ramses Well-Known Member

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    wow!
     
  10. Wangsuda

    Wangsuda Nonentity Staff Member

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    Just to let you know, he is NOT in an international school, nor a bilingual or English program. This is just a Thai language private school.
     
  11. wjblaney

    wjblaney New Member

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    My desires and yours for your son are mutually exclusive? Sorry, I don't see that. Also, I didn't mention other realities at my school. For example, I was given, by the sub-director of the school, three responsibilities, in the following order: 1) dress well (long-sleeve shirt, tie) 2) make the classes fun :huh: 3) teach conversational English. Those are my goals. I was given no other guidelines for lesson planning, no textbooks, up to 40 students per class, no Thai assistant (a big help for translation) and approximately 600 students per week (is that a 600 - 1 student/teacher ratio?) I was given no disciplinary procedures to follow: there was a murder on the campus last semester, during the lunch hour and in a classroom (3 boys kicked a 4th to death). Where was the teacher moderator? Why are classrooms left unspervised? Why are students allowed to wander the halls during class? When i complain about student behavior, I'm told to be more patient ("it's the Thai way").
     
  12. Wangsuda

    Wangsuda Nonentity Staff Member

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    This just begs the question - why are you still there? And you are right, that is a shit situation for both teachers and students.
     
  13. wjblaney

    wjblaney New Member

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    Yes, good question. But a contract is a contract, right? So I am committed until next year. And I am a newbie teacher: for me this is normal (one of the reasons I joined this forum is to find out what is 'normal'). Also, my goal as a teacher is to give something back and, if I can have an influence - on admin., students, fellow teachers - that's all for the good. But I still don't know if things are changeable because of the Thai way of doing things. :wai2: (A coworker tends to put the blame solely on the school's director for his lack of participation in the daily life of the teachers and students.)
     
  14. Gor Blimey Guvnur!

    Gor Blimey Guvnur! What the duck ! Staff Member

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    I just read your paragraph ...that stood out ...Me, I'd leave:happy1:

    But yep, what is normal? Lots of schools have big number classrooms, poor facilities, and little guidance in how and what to teach .... AKA bumble along, chuck Ingrish bit in here and there and hope that it makes sense at the end of a semester.

    But then, it's not all schools, some can be professional, helpful, prepared, and well planned ... Some .... and that's where you need to move to WJ IMO:thumbsup2:
     
  15. Wangsuda

    Wangsuda Nonentity Staff Member

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    Not in some situations . . . such as the one you described.

    It is, when you're in a situation where you can do some good. Let's face it, from your description you're in a dumping ground school where no one cares about anything. Time to cut and run.
     

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