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This week Macmillan was fined $17m by the High Court after a Serious Fraud Office investigation,

Discussion in 'Classroom' started by sirchai, 11 Mar 2017.

  1. sirchai

    sirchai Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Funny, there's a thread about books from this company.

    I thought it's worth to have a look here:

    "The company admitted that a representative of Macmillan Education made "improper and unauthorised payments" to local officials in its unsuccessful bid to win a multimillion-pound contract to print English language teaching and school curriculum materials. The tender was part of a $45.9m project to develop the school curriculum, train thousands of teachers, build 100 schools and refurbish a further 50." (Macmillan ordered to pay $17m for corruption in South Sudan | Global development | The Guardian)

    In a reply to a Freedom of Information request that I lodged that the 'big four' (their term) UK ELT publishers, Macmillan included, were given free advertising and free sample give away rights on the BBC and British Council's flagship 'Teaching English' website for over a year after launch, to the exclusion of all other publishers (TeachingEnglish | British Council | BBC).

    Please see: Discrimination in ELT Industry | English Out There
     
  2. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA την σκαφην σκαφην λεγοντας

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    That's interesting. It reminds me of how the Peace Corps used to be a front for the CIA.

    The best thing that could happen to Sudan is for it to go back to colonial rule by English gentlemen.

    It is rare to find a human institution that does not corrupt its people, that is not fake, that has not surrendered to the self-interest of a few "leaders" who have their paws in the cookie jar. It is a strange thought: you want to educate tens of thousands of helpless kids in a destitute country, so the first thing you have to do is give enormous amounts of money to corrupt officials, whose hands are sticking out towards you. Those officials want to send their kids to Switzerland to private school, or perhaps they are already there. One day you are called to your supervisor's office, and she says you need to develop ethical students for the twenty-first century who can used cutting-edge technologies and innovate. Honesty, ethics, and caring--the three pillars of global citizenship.
     
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  3. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA την σκαφην σκαφην λεγοντας

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    Sorry, that wasn't written very well. I don't know about you, but the most gut-wrenching thing I ever had to do was teach ethics to a group of wide-eyed college kids in Thailand, otherwise known as the LOS--the Land of Smile.

    I learned something: when you notice that the president of your university has a Cheshire Cat smile, and he almost hugs himself with glee when he gets up to talk at those de rigueur university parties flowing with alcohol and ladyboys, it is because his bank account is swelling with cash. You know, want a master's? Sign here. Visa or Mastercard, or cash? High-quality paper? Gold trim?

    And then they tell you to teach ethics! Being a man of wide experience, the suddenness of that shocked even me.

    In Sudan, I imagine their system of education as strictly moral. It produces global citizens of good character only. Girded with unimpeachable morals, they skyrocket out of poverty.

    Teaching morality is like going on a date, parking your car, sitting in the front seat with your darling, and saying, "what is romance?"

    Since, in the big picture, the main ingredient of the soup is missing, there is no monkey business that won't be tried in the attempt to make the soup look good--even though the taste is off.
     
    Last edited: 12 Mar 2017
  4. sirchai

    sirchai Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Corruption exists in all countries and societies. Even in countries like Germany. I hope that I'm allowed to cover that with one example.

    G., a friendly older German gentleman, who unfortunately had to go way too early, after living a long time in a small Isaan village after a heart attack and the wrong doctors.
    He worked for the German government, to be more precise for the city of Nuremberg. Whenever a building or ( for the city) very important land was on sale, they'd sent him to the auctions with a blanko check. Of course was not the city mentioned as the buyer and he always scored.
    Then the weekly "Stammtisch", where certain upper-class workers met for a beer or a glass of wine.
    K.. was his good mate from school and wanted a piece of land where all already knew that a shopping mall chain showed the highest interest in this land.

    But G.. was such a nice guy that he closed one eye when an envelope with a good sum all in a sudden disappeared in his pocket. He found that out at home and made his wife happy with a new car.

    G made all the documents ready and as the boss, he could sign whatever he wanted to. K was so happy that he even invited G for a holiday in Asia with free companionship and all inclusive. That was when G met the very experienced bar woman who gave him the rest.

    K then made a fortune when he sold the land to the big company.

    But no, you can't really call that corruption, can you?
     

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