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The Subjunctive

Discussion in 'English Language' started by DavidUSA, 6 May 2016.

  1. ramses

    ramses Well-Known Member

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    luckily for you I have better things to do than get pissed. Cheers mate.
     
  2. Aj Michael

    Aj Michael Well-Known Member

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    Just as there is more to language than obscure points of grammar, so there is more to a pub than getting pissed. Lighten up, check one out. If you can lose the chauvinistic attitude that one form of English reigns supreme, you may even get on ok with the plebs whose vernacular has long since lost the subjunctive.
     
  3. tiredtony

    tiredtony Well-Known Member

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    Admittedly, its rather formal English, but please explain the connection to US English. I remember learning the conjunctive at school and hear it used frequently, especially down the pub...."If I were you, I'd go home now before you get pissed" "I suggest you leave immediately"
    English English as well or not?
     
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  4. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Thanks a lot for your thoughtful comments. I see that you are right.
     
  5. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Aj Michael is right about what he implies: these days the subjunctive mood is more frequent in American English than in British English. However, the subjunctive was prominent in Anglo-Saxon and in early Middle English.

    The best place to learn English is England. There is no doubt about it. My view, which might be considered to be outdated, is to show respect to the past and try to hold on to what remains.
     
  6. portnoy58

    portnoy58 Well-Known Member

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    I need to declare my interest as a Scot but with the exception of Shakespeare, I really fancy that it would be difficult to surpass the literature of America's great nineteenth-century wordsmiths: Melville, Hawthorne, Fenimore Cooper, Thoreau etc. Have you ever read The Last of the Mohicans? What a story and what writing! Then there's the Irish and of course the Scots too. Of course there are many fine English writers too. So I beg to disagree with your assertion about England being the best place to learn English! I would stick my neck out and say the most important factor in learning anything might be your teacher.
     

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