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Teaching without a Work Permit...Is it really that big a deal???

Discussion in 'Work permits' started by FedUp, 30 Apr 2014.

  1. FedUp

    FedUp Thread Starter New Member

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    Not getting any replies to my other thread so thought I'd ask in a more direct way here. Please excuse the overlap of ideas and situations....Thank you in advance...

    While we all know you need a WP to legally teach, I was wondering about actual experiences where teachers in Government schools are in fact questioned on campus by police. It seems to me, in a Government setting, the school Director would normally be approached first. It doesn't, again using my concept of Thai culture, seem possible that a farang teacher would be tracked down in a classroom and arrested on the spot in front of students etc. without first the Director being given an ultimatum. We all also know that several "agencies" never get their teachers Work Permits (or VISA's) and teachers are sometimes left on their own to make border runs or teach while on retirement or "education" or marriage types of VISA's.

    In summary once again, regrets for the long inquiry, in short and to the point, "does it ever happen", it being teachers getting picked up at a Government school for being there without all the legal paperwork? Please assume said "teacher" isn't a suspect in some other inquiry or crime. All things held as constant and otherwise legal(aka not a criminal sought) does the teacher actually have anything to "worry" about in this regard? I mean at the worse, is she going to be told by the Director that she's got to leave and call it a day or exactly what?

    We all would like to be "legal" but in reality, there are sometimes too many hurdles to jump and/or agencies have to make money and money talks.
     
  2. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    During my 12+ years as a teacher in Thailand I have heard of several teachers who are working on a tourist visa or education visa and are not holding a work permit. As I write I even know of some teachers in our region who don't hold a work permit. I've not heard of any raids by the police or investigators of the Labour Department in any school in our provincial capital.

    Working in Thailand without a valid work permit is illegal and without a work permit you can't contribute and benefit from the Social Security fund for health insurance.

    I've heard of teachers somewhere else in the country who have been caught for working without a valid work permit but the story behind it was that it happened after a tip-off by somebody with importance.
     
  3. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Just posted in another thread.

    VISA extended, but Work Permit denied......
     
  4. steveolevi

    steveolevi Well-Known Member

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    Every year at my government school I, along with all other teachers (Thai and foreign), am asked to submit a portfolio that includes all my docs, permits, and visa. I 've been told that "government agencies" come to inspect everyone's docs. I have heard that immigration and labor are involved, but I've never heard of any problems even with some dodgy teachers employed. I know the Director is adamant that everyone comply, and if everything is ok then everything is ok. Wink, wink.
     
  5. FedUp

    FedUp Thread Starter New Member

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    The health insurance aka Social (Security) is an important point. This would IMHO once again require communication between the agencies. I specifically mean if the school continues to make the deductions and matching funds and makes the payment as required in a timely manner, we are once again at the mercy of laws not always enforced. These matters seem so simple but since peoples emotions are involved along with the cultural differences, discussion is warranted. So, with all that typed, would you suggest I make the payment as a now terminated employee in order to retain my social benefits? As you might anticipate, such a situation would not be the usual case i.e. getting payment for the same person from two different sources.
     
  6. NODIIT

    NODIIT Well-Known Member

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    The question about the SSO is a good one.

    My former school didn't pay the last 3 months of my contract last year. I offer to the officer at the SSO to pay it by miself. She insisted that she would deal with it (she was the head of the SSO in Kalasin) because I couldn't pay instead of the school.

    Eventually after I insisted the school payed all.

    So from my experience, you can't pay instead of the school but it is true that the SSO never checked my WP.
     
  7. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

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    For me the "knowing I'm legal" thing is very important. Want to plan, build a life? then get legal. Knowing that you do not have to rely on agencies and can stand on your own is a great feeling and firm foundations on which to build a future in Thailand
     
    Mister T likes this.
  8. Corsair

    Corsair Well-Known Member

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    ^ This. If a school and/or agency can't be bothered to get me legal, I can't be bothered to work for them. They have 90 days after first day of school. It's the least they can do as I not only teach, but they graft up to 50% of my salary.

    I'm married. No school or agency is going to ruin my life over greed or laziness.
     
  9. FedUp

    FedUp Thread Starter New Member

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    Well said. I tend to agree in my particular circumstance.

    One must ask where you are getting the "90 days after the first day of school" ?
     

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