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Teaching until you jump in the box?

Discussion in 'The Teachers Lounge' started by sirchai, 28 Sep 2016.

  1. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Well-Known Member

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    Education is big business in China. I have been teaching here for 2.5 years. China is now like Korea where everyone wants to learn English for better opportunities in the future mostly abroad. Although, I love Thailand and have been there so many times to visit, I will only go there if I get a high paying job in an International school in the future.

    What a great OP and it makes me think too. Now at 44, I am starting a M.Ed. and may be moving into a higher paid position and location next year. I just want to do what I love (teach) and get paid well for it. Every year I am moving up on the salary scale. Started from diddly and moved up to a decent wage. I want to save some and hope to have a decent nest egg when I retire at 60-65.

    I haven't really saved much over the years because I travel so much and enjoy life. I think life is short and you have to enjoy it because you may not be here tomorrow, yet on the other hand, the future lurks. I have to be the one to save for my future, because at the moment no husband is going to provide for me. :)

    TomPatz, has an interesting life and good for you for doing that gig. Writing something will be in my future, but I'm not sure what yet. :)
     
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  2. sirchai

    sirchai Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Well, there is and there isn't. Here's a website with a lot of good advice about the topic, but it's nowhere mentioned that you can't get into the Thai SS insurance.

    Is There an Age Limit for Teaching English in Thailand? | Tasty Thailand


    As usual, it seems to be different from province to province, but the Aussie with a heart attack was a great example why someone should have an insurance.

    I remember "Lung D" who was already 72 and worked at a high school in Ubon Ratchathani, the kids and teachers liked him a lot and we often ran into each other at competitions.

    72 was the age when the Dol stopped granting him a work permit with the reason being too old.

    But once out of the system, I don't think that you can continue paying into your SS privately and how many here on this forum do have a private insurance?

    Do you really want to "copy" various European countries to let the workers continue until they're 67, or older?

    Wouldn't retirement age be something special where people can travel, read books, meet friends, etc?

    I really think that once receiving retirement, most people should make some place for the younger folks, or use their knowledge to educate them.

    An extra website at TTA for over 75-year-olds, how to live with Alzheimer, Perkinson and being a teacher?

    There are always two sides of the coin. Have a lovely Sunday.
     
    DavidUSA likes this.
  3. sirchai

    sirchai Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    He didn't die, I guess his heart has stopped for a few seconds or a minute? Knowing that it can happen again, anytime and anywhere would give me some serious thoughts.

    Wouldn't your common sense tell you to go back to your country and get your pump checked?

    But I also understand that many people don't have anybody to go back and it can be difficult to get back into the system.
     
  4. tassiecatred

    tassiecatred Member

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    It's a long time since I posted. Just looking today and came across this topic. Early December, I went to the hospital with some pains in my chest. Missed two days of school. Yep, it was my ticker playing up. It made me think seriously about my future. Thoughts:"You could live for ten weeks, ten months or even ten years. Do you really want to die in a classroom or doing something more mentally relaxing?" I decided for the latter.
    So I went back to school with the hospital letter and tended my resignation which took effect on 30th December last. I heard it all: "It's the middle of the final semester, what about the students? It's only 12 weeks to go! Who's going to teach them? etc etc." Thoughts I had already considered myself.
    I've spent 11 years in Thailand thinking about students, lesson plans, teaching methods etc, but in the end, it came down to my health and my life.
     
  5. muppetminder

    muppetminder Active Member

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    I was retired at 42.5 a huge goal for me. Got married, things changed and I returned to work as much to get out of the flat as for a bit of extra dosh.

    I'm trying to come up with a way to get myself (us) back on the road. I figure US2k will allow us to scrimp by. I want it to happen now.

    But it's not going to happen till I hit 62 and even then I fear I'll be US3-5k short per year. I REALLY need interest rates to rise or I'll be pulling principle for a decade.

    Whatever's left at 72.5 I'll reassess, maybe buy a condo and settle.

    Thinking of ways we or I could work only May-Oct.

    Teaching waivers are ruining my dream and my wife is useless in China. C'mon TCT wtf!
     
  6. muppetminder

    muppetminder Active Member

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    In regard to being older:

    Personally, at +55 it's no barrier or very little. Having said that, I'm currently at a ridiculous job which does tax me physically and I think someone younger would be a better fit. It's a job that 1.5 persons should be tasked with.

    IMO the largest barrier to getting a good job when you are old is not all that different than when you are young.

    If you're overweight, look 65-70, appear tired, poorly dressed and generally lack energy you're not going to get the best schools, salaries, etc.

    Can you get a McYob at 65+. Sure, possible but 60-63 better odds. After that, if your a Klingon you can hold a job. If your competing, most won't fare well.

    I do know a guy, 67 not in best of health but relatively decent energy. He's still working decent schools for decent money.


    All of you remotely worried about a future and not married need to GTFO to China.
     
  7. Ajarn P. Paul

    Ajarn P. Paul มันเป็นวันที่น่าเศร้าในวันนี้ในประเทศไทย ...

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    I do know a guy, 71 in fairly decent health and relatively decent energy.
    Received his 4th teaching waiver.
    He's still working at a decent public school for decent money.
    He also has a tutoring job 3 days a week after school hours.
     
  8. sirchai

    sirchai Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    I'm really sorry to hear of your misfortune and would like to thank you for sharing.

    I hope that you could find a decent way to stay where you want to be and your health is getting better.

    Your post is a great example why I was never planning anything when I'm 70 + because I somehow got the feeling that I'll never get that old.

    I always had a relatively good financial backup, until I had my bike accident and the crash bar did a good job breaking my bones at my knee five times right under and at the Tibia head.

    The Thai operation in form of a metal plate was a better joke and I had to go from classroom to classroom on crutches for a couple of months until I was confronted with the reality.

    The local doctor just didn't send me to specialists in Ubon Ratchathani, no loss of face bla bla that made my life to a nightmare.

    After eight months of suffering without any chances to be able to walk again, I went to see a specialist in Ubon where they also do artificial knee joints. His diagnosis was to cut my bones in tiny little pieces, put the pieces together and if the healing process would be okay they could think of an artificial knee joint.

    That was like a punch in my face and I knew I had to go to Europe for some serious surgeries. I sold my beloved bike, flew to Germany and had to find a way to get back into the system. I was successful and went to one of the best orthopedical hospitals in my area.

    Two operations then a rehabilitation with a wound that never closed. When I got back for a check up their faces told me that something wasn't quite right. I had to stay and it was an older nurse who finally found out what all the Superdoctors didn't get.

    It already started with an accident when one of the operating doctors "forgot" a huge piece of bone concrete inside my wound. That was the first thing I saw when they rolled their mobile high tech thingy in.

    Okay, next day another operation, even when they wanted to tell me that it wouldn't be a problem and I could leave it inside. Only when it comes between the joint cleft. I really lost my temper and told him to get the sh.. out asap, otherwise he'd have to talk to my lawyer.

    The artificial knee joint came with a very serious Staphylococcus Aureus infection and I was very close to get my leg underneath the knee amputated.

    I even had to modify my wheelchair to be able to make it to the canteen always watched by people who looked at all the machines I was attached to.They had to cut a lot of flesh and a huge amount of tissue was destroyed.

    The older nurse helped me to keep my right leg, she said it in her funny slang that they'd have to cut ALL that stuff out because it's all infected.

    Why did the doctors who visited twice a day didn't see that? I'll never ever say something bad about a Thai hospital anymore. They didn't give me the infection.

    My wife then ran out of money and I had to send her my ATM card, not knowing how the circus would end.

    One wheel turns another and I unfortunately also lost my ticket back, the six months I thought would be enough were all in a sudden not important anymore. The whole hospital was diseased and they had to shut the wing down a few days after I sat on the plane.

    Lufthansa was in no way cooperative and all the letters from doctors didn't help me to fly a few weeks later.and they finally sent me an e-mail that there's no chance, but I could buy a new ticket. Never again, please never fly with them, they put a lot of extra seats in to make more money and the service is shitty.

    I waited until my Hartz 4 money came in, left the place for homeless people where I "luckily"? wasn't staying often, because of the fantastic job of some German knee specialists.

    Then I found the job at my former school through a friend and I know that I should still be there. This year will be very important, looking for a new job, getting 57 in May and I've got the feeling that there'll always be ways to continue living an okay life in Thailand.

    Your sentence "who's going to teach them?" bla, bla is also a problem for me when I'm leaving. After three years of teaching them 9 hours per week, it's not that easy to say goodbye.

    But we all have to move on and I hope that you're doing much better now.

    It wasn't really an accident, a brake malfunction with a blocked rear wheel on a dirt road at a friend's house, a Thai teacher, kicked me off when I was only doing 25 km/h.

    The five guys I sat down with before were watching me when I did my stunt and I knew that I was in deep shit when I wanted to get up, but my leg pointed into a different direction.

    Please don't try such a stunt with a 270 kg bike. You'll lose.

    Stay healthy and happy and please keep on posting. You'll never walk alone.
     
  9. Gor Blimey Guvnur!

    Gor Blimey Guvnur! What the duck ! Staff Member

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    I am so sorry to hear this. Life does throw some right curve balls eh. I hope your new path takes you where you want to be tassie. Xxx GBG.
     
  10. tassiecatred

    tassiecatred Member

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    ^^^
    Thank you GBG. As I said before, I've spent the last 11 years thinking about teaching and gardening in our home. I've never left the province I live in except a few day trips to Bangkok. So now my plans include more gardening, reading, working in our home and occasional short holiday trips around Thailand and neighbouring Asian countries. My wife has had more holidays than I have, so now it's her turn to stay home and look after the home and the animals.
     
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