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Nottingham MA Education (Flexible) (Part time)

Discussion in 'Qualifications & Courses' started by bahn_farang, 18 Dec 2016.

  1. stfranalum

    stfranalum Well-Known Member

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    consider your finances, it would be a very good choice. many places just need some kind of certificate (legit...recognized company) and along with a B.A., you are good to go.

    now thats not a long term career qualification, but it certainly gets you in the door at way WAY better jobs.


    the place i recruit for and teach in. no, not elite. governmental training center. its a great place to work- no micromanaging, stable job...but its by far not elite.

    BA in anthropology. after that i went to korea. turkey. back to korea lol. then thailand. then japan. then, i was like 'fark me, these jobs are some bullshit- this was 2001) and then went to get my master's in english. i worked other jobs for a few years (mom was sick and wanted to be near home as a priority), and then after her passing, went to thailand with master's in hand. did that for a few years. had a kid. moved back to the states (am i freaking boring you to death lol) and then back to the job i previously had in thailand. i love thailand, you see. but i realized that it wasnt good for my nor my son's future. so then, off to saudi arabia, and here i am.

    professionally, the best thing you can do is get on a plane and GTFO of thailand. period. full stop.


    the MA is a good bet. given how much it costs, you may want to think about a CELTA and then using an agency to place you in a school. the middle east is not a bad place to be, given what you had said about yourself. a few years there and you are financially on your feet. that matters. the celta can take you there.

    celtas arent expensive, comparatively in regards to time and money.


    so common. it's a sand trap, ironically enough. and after some time in the desert, you are not stuck in the sand. funny, that.

    i too, felt that a few times in thailand...feeling like you just need to stay there. its easy to live there, and yet, a slow demise of your professional life.

    gold medal advice here, sage. and consider that digital gypsy...that you may in fact be better off rethinking - the critical and often uncomfortable rethinks that get people out of their doldrums.

    save...have a holiday...recreate your life. feel valued as a professional. develop yourself and grow. save. look toward the future.

    ...or swamp. beer with ice. morlam. somtam. these are nice things. but they aren't going anywhere (nor are you) and will be there any time you choose to visit and alight them with your presence.

    like a bad relationship, thats not too bad, but also not good...the biggest effort is deciding to move on. and im talking about the kind of relationship thats not really abusive and compels you to leave, but the kind that is a slow death. not horrible, but also keeping you back. many people stay in relationships like this so long that they lose sight of their potential, opportunities, and pass their life by- happy days- that could have been spent utilizing their skills and even being with a person that feels grateful for who they are. newsflash: thailand is not grateful for your contribution. they do not care about your future and as such, will find another sap to come in and work fo poverty wages, while asking them to jump through a gillion hurdles to have the honor for said wages.

    it's a working, professional relationship that needs to come to an end.

    ...you can always visit them when you have time. ;-)
     
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  2. stfranalum

    stfranalum Well-Known Member

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    not that y'all need updates, but just off the phone with a guy who graduated from lancaster university in ol' blighty. distance learning degree and having a time of it finding work that isn't agency-referred teaching. he, thinking his quals qualify him for X pay, but finding that he is only allowed to get a visa in a few places (oman and UAE).

    this isnt a blanket statement and such. but he has a celta and was most likely better off just with his celta...and not having the debt of that master's degree giving him the pressure to make 10 grand more than he's getting offers of.

    there's probably not one good reason why a decent distance learning MA is any better or worse than being in the classroom. its all perception and such. but its just the perception OF THOSE who make the rules. and to be frank, that same perception game is why a lot of native speakers have jobs, or get first picks, in the first place.

    a fucking right state, it's in, innit.
     
  3. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Would love to hear from those doing or have done an MA in education.

    I think the arguments for and against doing one have been well cooked (a huge thank you for all contributions, this whole thread has, for me, been tremendously beneficial so far) as has the debate on online education, pretty much, it would appear comes down to personal experience and situation and it sounds like there are both positives and negatives to be had.
     
  4. OxfordDon

    OxfordDon Well-Known Member

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    A few thoughts...

    I'd guess the most difficult thing to crack is the self-discipline required to do online study, and it seems like you've cracked that already.

    Re the online v campus-based discussion, I think you are more likely to get experienced professionals on the online option, and the international network will almost certainly be better on the online option. Many online MAs are certificated in exactly the same way as campus-based MAs, after all they are usually the same degree - it's just the delivery method that changes. AFAIK you will be entitled to the UK rate as you have a British passport, but surely that was confirmed one way or another already with the PGCE?

    I agree with a lot of what Thom said, but the thesis/dissertation defense stuff varies substantially with territory, institution and faculty. It seems to be much less common in the UK for MAs than the USA. I can't remember that it featured at all for my UK campus-based MA (though it's possible that I'm misunderstanding what Thom is saying) , but of course you do have to work closely with the relevant tutor to identify and specify a thesis topic that hasn't been done before. If you're serious about becoming a recognised expert in a specific field then the choice of thesis topic is very important.

    Keeping on top of the reading is key. I remember getting up at 5.30 every day to do a couple of hours of precis and note-taking (I'm an early bird anyway!), and that really helped me a lot.

    The benefits of an MA are substantial in my opinion: mine certainly opened the career doors I was expecting, and a few that I never even knew existed at the time, and the training in research methods can be re-applied in many ways in other disciplines - academic and professional, then there's just the knowledge itself.

    Chok dee, and bon voyage!
     
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  5. covertjay

    covertjay Member

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    100% agree with this. We are talking about a top ten U.K. University and top 100 in the world. To be honest I got far more out of the PGCEi than my bricks and mortar degree due to their exacting standards.

    My other concern was the library access portal and access to literature in general out here. However their online library is outstanding, and whatever gaps there were I could find something on google scholar.

    Would you be comfortable posting the international student fees and length of time it runs for here? If not I'd appreciate a DM.

    Keep us posted on your interesting journey and good luck!




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
     
  6. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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  7. portnoy58

    portnoy58 Well-Known Member

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    I have no doubt that the best thing I ever did for my career development was to enrol and complete the Nottingham PGCEi. If it is 'not recognised', too bad. I'll take myself some place where it is recognised. It's not an online course - it's blended. If you don't attend the face to face, you won't get the certificate.

    I opted for Masters at the Institute of Education/University College London - I have never done anything that is so challenging. I allow for the possibility it might be too much for me and it is early days still. IOE/UCL allow you to attend in person or to study online; some modules are attend in London only, some are online online, some are both. But you can do everything online. Basically you've got five years to complete and it is up to you. I like this flexibility - I can attend the taught part of a module in London. The fees are the same.

    I would suggest that tertiary education, especially in the social sciences and humanities, is the part of education that is most likely to feel the impact of ICT and digital literacies. I believe we are not far away from undergraduate degrees being taught exclusively online. I guess the challenge is one's digital signature and ensuring that everything that is submitted for assessment has been done by the person whose name is on it. They already have some sophisticated ways of checking and I guess more are on the way. I can't see this being applied in secondary or primary at this stage .... but this is another argument. The point is there will be more electronic/online education, especially in the post graduate sector, and it is inevitable that authorities will have to accept it as certification. I don't really care - I enjoy the study, it makes me a better teacher, I accept that I have no entitlement to anything by dint of experience or qualification; I remain optimistic.

    So as well as satisfying UCL/IOE's entrance requirements the PGCEi enabled me to cash in my classroom experience in Thailand by landing a new job in China. Theoretically I could be here with my bare bones credentials from an earlier century but I would definitely not be on the same money. I'm now in my fourth month here so this month's pay check means the increase in pay that came with this job has now paid for the Nottingham fees and a bit more.

    A happy optimistic teacher aged 58.5 years!
     
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  8. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Here starts the next journey. Anyone else starting next week?

    Screen Shot 2560-02-06 at 9.27.57 PM.png
     
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