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Non-native English teachers may soon be prohibited from teaching in China

Discussion in 'Education News from other countries' started by Stamp, 10 Jan 2017.

  1. Stamp

    Stamp Thread Starter Administrator Staff Member

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    by Alex Linder in News on Jan 9, 2017 7:10 pm


    In its continuing crackdown against the scourge of unskilled laowai, China is attempting to start phasing out non-native English teachers from its schools.

    Back in October, China infamously began testing out a brand new work permit system that would neatly classify foreign workers into three distinct categories: A, B and C expats. That system is currently being rolled out in Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin and other places first, before it expands farther afield in April.

    Apparently, one part of this new system is a rule that mandates all foreign English teachers must be native English speakers -- along with holding a bachelor's degree from their home country and having two years of teaching experience.

    Prior to this, you officially only needed a bachelor's degree from an English-speaking country and two years of teaching experience to qualify for a proper work visa. While many institutions were able to bend the rules and hire candidates with far fewer qualifications than that.

    So far, details of the new policy are scarce. It's not clear how many countries will qualify as "native English-speaking." The Global Times speaks to Noli Castillano Apachicha, a Filipino English teacher in Beijing who is worried about losing his job.

    "I expect that later on, I will not be qualified for my job because of this new regulation," he said. "It will also shun many qualified non-native speakers like me who hope to come to teach English in China."

    However, considering China's massive need for foreign English teachers, it's not clear how stringently this new rule will be implemented and how far it will spread. Critics of the policy point out how it will almost certainly lead to an overall decrease in the quality of English teaching in China with higher salaries for native speakers pricing schools in lower-tier cities out of the foreign expert market.

    Meanwhile, dodgy English language training centers that this rule is obviously aimed at will simply find ways around the new regulations and continue with business as usual. For instance, back in November, one shady Shanghai training center got in trouble with parents after a Russian English teacher decided to tape some of her students' mouth shut. The woman had been working at the school for a year, despite only having received her work permit in October.

    Critical of the rule, Apachicha advocates that the government should find ways of looking more closely at a teacher's knowledge and skill rather than his/her place of birth.

    "Why not give teachers a licensing examination to ensure the quality of education being received from Chinese students? It doesn't matter if you are native or non-native; credit should be given to all great teachers no matter their nationality," he said.


    Non-native English teachers may soon be prohibited from teaching in China: Shanghaiist
     
  2. Tonyja

    Tonyja Well-Known Member

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    I read about this a few months ago. Even more demand for NES and even more nnes coming here then.
     
  3. ttompatz

    ttompatz Just another teacher

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    China absorbs 50,000 teachers per year and with a population of 1.3 billion that is a drop in the bucket of demand.

    They won't find 50,000 native speakers per year with degrees willing to put up with Chinese policy - especially if China and the US follow a hard-line policy during the new presidency.

    Something will have to give.

    .
     
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  4. gungchang

    gungchang Well-Known Member

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    I guess this is what my school was talking about when they told me that there were new rules regarding my residence permit. It may not be coincidence that immigration is no longer accepting Korean stamps in lieu of Chinese stamps on my marriage certificate translation.

    We are tested, in a sense. We take an online Foreign Expert test. I embarrassed myself. There were some vocabulary questions. I've listened to 12 Girls Band, and I knew the words were musical instruments, but I didn't know which ones.

    My mediocre score is in a registry. No other schools are trying to snatch me up.
     
  5. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Well-Known Member

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    I know so many non-native teachers working in China. I also work with many Filipinos. I highly doubt that this will happen anytime in the near future. I see that Beijing is now crying out for NES to work in their public schools. I read that there are 30,000 teaching jobs in Beijing right now. You have your pick if you want to come here. ;)
     
  6. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    olice checkI believe that a test and an interview with some "special questions" including a police clearance shows enough about the teacher's ability. A test should be mandatory for English and subject teachers.

    One of my uncles taught English for a log time before he became the principal of the school. I helped out for a while and tutored some of his students on weekends. My uncle is well travelled and you wouldn't hear an accent.

    We don't hire English or American people to teach English at our schools and universities in Germany and it seems to work well. And you won't find a Filipino teaching English at a German school.

    The only good Filipino teachers I've worked with were those with a teacher's license from their country back home. They all have degrees in education and a Thai teacher's license, the TCT doesn't have the manpower to check on them.

    As a recruiter I was trying to find out if the degree of a Filipino was a real one because he wanted to have it "cleaned" by a Thai lawyer, but I never received an answe ro my e-mails I'v sent to the university in question.

    Wouldn't that ake sense to apply for a teacher's license in the Philippines first and then come to Thailand? That would make the whole TCT part easier and the salary might be better. But why are 99 % without a Filipino TL but holding degrees in education? Maybe because you can buy your degree there?

    A head teacher of a big pimary school has got a PhD in education from the Philippines, but she's never there. Money, money, money, it's the rich man's world....

    Would an NNES with a teacher's license from an ASEAN country be entitled to teach in China? Just curious. If I'd go to China then eventulally only if I could teach German and English. Sounds interesting to me.

    Cheers to the communistas. :go10
     
  7. Ajarn Greg

    Ajarn Greg Well-Known Member

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    However as I have read in some articles a couple of months ago, if the teacher has a degree from a country where English is the native language, he will be considered as Native speaker...
     
  8. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    If they don't want me in China i will go to Brunei make a lot more money and drive a Rolls Royce then.
     
  9. SageAdvice

    SageAdvice Well-Known Member

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    Good idea: a foreign chauffeur is a status symbol there:smiling.
     
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  10. portnoy58

    portnoy58 Well-Known Member

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    This is a worry as Mrs P is a Filipino and both highly educated and qualified, richly experienced and a near perfect TOIEC, possibly better English than me, the NES! The plan is for her to come to China end of the current Thai academic year. Fortunately she can enter on a dependent visa and in a worst case scenario, she could do online lessons. However she would be an asset in most staff rooms though she would be the first to concede that many of her fellow nationals, employed in LOS and elsewhere as teachers, are a disgrace.

    But the Chinese education authorities, specifically the Foreign Experts Bureau, are on the case and up to speed. They've probably been watching developments in Thailand over the last twenty years and seen what has happened. They see there's a loophole and are moving to close it. Clearly implementation is going to vary enormously.

    So much for Mr DU30's recent visit to China and his willingness to get into bed with the comrades for money!
     
  11. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Well-Known Member

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    lol... well you can get one, but you'll be paying a lot of money back to the company for it over a few years or more. ;)
     

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