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Noh--Something Awesome to See in Japan

Discussion in 'Travel' started by DavidUSA, 19 Jun 2017.

  1. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter την σκαφην σκαφην λεγοντας

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    If traditional Japanese culture interests you, then watching a Noh drama will be fascinating.

    The National Noh Theater in Sendagaya, Tokyo is one of many Noh theaters in the country, and it may be the finest.

    As a dramatic art, Noh is distinctive, especially in its compressed narratives, elegant costumes, and inwardness. It has aspects which could be compared to a seventeenth-century masque, such as Milton's "Comus". There is also a comic interlude, a Kyogen, which is a highly developed artform itself. And Kyogen is just plain funny.

    Like sumo or the tea ceremony, Noh is laden with the depths of Japanese ways, and it is a striking experience.

    Tickets can be purchased online. I go as often as I can, and this last one, "Hanjo", was powerful. I have been six or seven times; it is extraordinary.

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    Last edited: 19 Jun 2017
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  2. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter την σκαφην σκαφην λεγοντας

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    There are interesting parallels between Thailand's Khon and Noh, but it is the differences which shed light on national character.

    I saw Khon once in Bangkok, and that was fun.

    And the Thai dancing across the river from the Mandarin Oriental in their restaurant/performance hall is not to be missed.

    This comparison of Khon and Noh is deeply telling of the differences between Thai and Japanese culure. In the comparison one can reach specific and interesting insights into both.

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  3. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter την σκαφην σκαφην λεγοντας

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    The Noh and Kyogen Guide Book.

    This is from the National Noh Theater in Tokyo, a brochure in the exhibition room.

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    Last edited: 20 Jun 2017
  4. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter την σκαφην σκαφην λεγοντας

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    A guide to exhibits inside the Noh Theater.

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  5. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter την σκαφην σκαφην λεγοντας

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    This theater has 629 seats, which are always full. Tickets can be purchased online about one month ahead of time. Once midnight strikes on the day the tickets are offered, you have a few minutes to get one. You can pay with Visa or Mastercard.

    On this website you should first become a member, and then you can buy tickets. Membership is free: National Theatre Ticket Centre | JAPAN ARTS COUNCIL

    The good news is that tickets become available on the website as people change theirs or cancel. If you keep checking the website, you can get a ticket. Special performances by famous actors might run about $75. For regular performances, the best seats will set you back about $45.

    They also have performances dedicated to educating children about Noh.

    Seats to the direct front of the main stage are the best, but the cheaper seats to the right of the main stage (along the hashigakari or passageway) are good too because you get a close view of the performers as they enter and exit.
     

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