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New requirement to notarise your degree at your embassy

Discussion in 'Visas and extensions of stay' started by magnumforce, 1 Oct 2015.

  1. magnumforce

    magnumforce Thread Starter Active Member

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    UPDATE:

    This is a national requirement. Not only do you have to get your degree notarized/verified by your embassy, you have to then get these documents verified at Changwattana in BKK.

    The following is based on the process my boss (British) just completed.
    Go to the British embassy in BKK. Get a letter and a copy of your degree notarized/verified and officially stamped. About 1500Thb or more.
    Go to Changwattana with these documents at 8am. Take a place in the queue. Get documents from embassy translated into Thai. 800ThB. Take downstairs to be certified and stamped. 400 + 300ThB service charge. Finish before 1pm. Registered post to have documents returned to you in 3 days. 60ThB.

    I am surprised this has not been given more attention. Maybe it will be soon.
     
    Stamp likes this.
  2. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Cheers for this, magnumforce. We're still talking about this being a requirement when applying for an extension of stay based on employment? Reason of Necessity 2.6 or 2.7?

    I thought the British Embassy didn't verify university degrees. :confused
     
  3. GanDoonToonPet

    GanDoonToonPet Well-Known Member

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    They don't, they only notarize them. The Embassy employee (notary) simply signs to verify that your signature on the copy is genuine. Nice work if you can get it. :yes

    No such nonsense for me when I renewed my extension last month. :angry3
     
  4. magnumforce

    magnumforce Thread Starter Active Member

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    You're welcome. I wish I didn't have to say anything about it because it's another damn inconvenience and expense, particularly the Changwattana part. They make it look like they are doubting the embassy. I will be writing to my embassy to ask them to question why their letter/notarization/verification is not accepted at face value and why it needs to even go to Changwattana. It's a disgrace that these Thai pencil pushers are allowed to effectively insult another country's embassy's word.

    As for 2.6 or 2.7, remind me what they are again as I have been absent from ThailandTeachingAsia's class for a while, sir? :teacher
     
    Last edited: 10 May 2016
  5. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Most welcome. :teacher

    Reasons of Necessity is the formal name of the reasons including a code on which an extension of stay, according to the Order of the Immigration Bureau 327/2557, is based.

    Below are some common ones.

     
  6. magnumforce

    magnumforce Thread Starter Active Member

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    I would fall into 2.7 then. :thumbs up
     
  7. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    The code of your extension of stay is written on the extension stamp in your passport.

    IMG.jpg
     
  8. magnumforce

    magnumforce Thread Starter Active Member

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    I don't have that in mine.
     
  9. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Care to post an edited scan or picture? Curious about what you have then!
     
  10. magnumforce

    magnumforce Thread Starter Active Member

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    I have the same as you except for that last part. I have had it before up North but not from Jomtien. Perhaps they forgot to add that stamp. Is it vital?
     
    Last edited: 11 May 2016
  11. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Not for the holder but I thought it's part of Immigration protocol. Similar to the name of the employer on top.
     
  12. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Well-Known Member

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    For U.S. Citizens: the U.S. Embassy in Bangkok will not authenticate your academic credentials. Nor will they certify that your degree (or transcript) is genuine. Certifying academic credentials is not what they do. But you can make a sworn statement about your credentials (an affidavit), which you will sign in front of a consular officer. It carries weight; that pretty stamp should dazzle the Thai authorities as much as needed.

    The other route is to have your college or university certify your diploma, and then it goes up the food chain to the U.S. State Department. Authentication Procedure | Bangkok, Thailand - Embassy of the United States

    If things get crazy in Thailand, you can mention to the powers that be that they are asking for the impossible (route one--not recommended) or you can find out if an affidavit will suffice (route two-not so difficult). Make an appointment here: Notary Services | Bangkok, Thailand - Embassy of the United States

    Route three is to go through the byzantine process of school, state, and State Department certification.

    More information from the U.S. Embassy's website:

    Affidavit


    An affidavit is a sworn statement. Affidavits may be used in many different situations for many different purposes. Using our blank affidavit form (PDF 36KB), you can write out almost any statement you may wish to make. Please remember not to sign the form before you come to the office. You will need to sign it in front of a Consul.


    Authentication of Vital Records, Academic, Commercial or Other Credentials Issued in the U.S.

    U.S. Consular officers are not empowered to authenticate public documents issued in the United States. Such documents include vital records (birth, marriage, death, and divorce), as well as academic, commercial, or other credentials. Consular officers do not have access to the records of the issuing office or the seal of the custodian of these records.

    Public documents issued in the United States may be authenticated by the designated official in the U.S. state or other jurisdiction where the public document was issued. For documents issued in the United States, please refer to the respective state’s authentication office for more information. The National Association of Secretaries of State website contains contact information for each state’s authentication authorities and can be found at: National Association of Secretaries of State - National Association of Secretaries of State
     
    Last edited: 12 May 2016
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  13. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Tow colleagues of mine did it for the purpose of converting their tourist visas into non-B visas and was accepted by the Immigration Office.
     
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  14. natewill

    natewill Active Member

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    Since this topic is a clear as mud, I have 1 question: who needs to go through this process? The rumor mill is that this certification/notarization/authentication ritual is only for those converting a tourist visa into a non-imm B visa. Is that accurate? Or does everybody have to do this? Because there are a fair number of people that have not had to this within the last 12 months (or ever). What subset of people need to worry about this?
     
  15. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    That's what I know. Only when changing a tourist visa into a non-immigrant B.
     
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