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Marking/preping

Discussion in 'Staffroom' started by Mr 1984, 22 Jan 2017.

  1. Mr 1984

    Mr 1984 Thread Starter New Member

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    Just a quick question. As an English language teacher how much work would I usually be required to do outside work hours? Marking, preping lessons etc. I'm guessing it differs from school to school or if you teach in a uni or private institution.
    Any advice?
    Thanks
     
  2. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    That's a real tough question. I usually spend my Sunday afternoons to get ready for a 6-hour straight Monday, preparing my worksheets and writing my lesson plans.

    But I've got to produce math, science and English worksheets for two EP classes and have to choose what parts of the books I'm using.

    I've got 20 contact hours and I must spend around 10 + hours per week checking worksheets and books at home, otherwise, I couldn't give them any homework.

    But if you're only teaching English to one grade it's a different ballgame and very easy to do at school when you're not teaching.

    It was so nice to teach only one grade a' two hours per class and week at my former school.
     
  3. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Your first year is the hardest. Translating the curriculum into a course outline and lesson plans is the work that has to be done. Second year the work is all done and experience leads you. Sometimes adaptation or adjustment based on student levels.

    I can't really say what time is involved whithout knowing the level and availabilty of books for both teachers and students.
     
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  4. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

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    Truth be told after 15 years I still find myself tinkering with previously taught lessons. What went well, what needs improvement. My humble advice for any teacher starting out is to keep a master log. In such log would be what has been taught and when, after what, what were the threshold moments, what proved to be the explanation that finally proved to be the turning point of understanding. This log will be your life saver, it will be your own manual. But like stamp said the unknowns are various.
     
  5. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher AKA phuketbound

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    Yes!
     
  6. Tonyja

    Tonyja Well-Known Member

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    I teach conversation so there is no need for planning my classes and
    I don't have any marking either.
    I can't think of what to do at work in my free time between lessons, let alone do stuff at home!
    :celebrate2
    Don't be serious

    It's not a complete doss, I have to write monthly lesson plans but we do that in March when the kids have gone and we have 3 weeks of nothing.
     
    Last edited: 24 Jan 2017
  7. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    I teach conversation so there is no need for planning my classes

    TT, that sounds a bit strange. Even when you teach conversational English there has to be a sort of planning, don't you agree?

    In my eyes not a great advice for a new teacher. Even conversational English needs at least some planning plus preparation and many schools want to see weekly, or even daily lesson plans.

    Don't you start at a point A when school starts and at the end of the year you will reach point Z by adding more vocabulary, sentence structure, etc?

    A lesson plan for the whole year with all the cancelled lessons and extracurricular stuff doesn't really work well, but I might be wrong.

    I don't have a problem to correct some stuff because it's part of my job.

    And I've made a commitment when I signed a contract knowing that this could happen to mark stuff after school hours, or producing stuff at home in my free time.

    And that's not even the reason why I will quit my job. How would you deal with such "extra activities" that seem to be the norm for quite a few of us?
     
  8. Tonyja

    Tonyja Well-Known Member

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    I work for an agency so I'm free from such extras. Inner city Bangkok high school students are a breeze for 40 mins at a time once a week. Check the names, give out the sheet, go through the new vocab, complete the sheet, stand up in pairs and converse on said subject.
    Pretty much that
     
  9. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    I taught grade six at my first school and just recently met two ex students I had in 2005, a brother with his sister who could both communicate quite well back then.

    After six more years of studying at the local high school, they've both lost everything they knew to have a conversation.

    When I found out that they forgot very basic English, we finally held the conversation in Thai that nobody lost face.

    One year agency x, the next year agency g and then again x. Always when they change, a big bonus for a few guys. Wow, great for the kids.

    It's really not the kids's fault, it's the system that s...s.

    I've also worked for an agency for three years and know that most of the students don't learn anything at high school.

    I had an advanced program with a Brit but his English was so poor that I had to create the worksheets and tests for him as well.

    I'll never forget when he "found out" that you can't use double negatives in a sentence. He looked like a child on Christmas when he figured that out.

    Colleagues were colleges and a teacher guy who's accused to have done something to a student, but regarding the super teacher he didn't approach the boy in a sexual "manor".

    I better stop, the guy's dangerous and still active.
     
  10. Gor Blimey Guvnur!

    Gor Blimey Guvnur! What the duck ! Staff Member

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    Its as long as a piece of string.

    Yep the 1st year is the hardest, after that refinement but you 'should' by then have the bones of it.

    For me at a Uni the 1st year was a killer with 5 courses to prep for and mark etc. Turned out to be a 7 day a week job and long days at that ....2nd year and 4 courses fairly easy. However, IMO compared to Prathom teaching , Uni stuff is harder and more hours required to get it right ...but f2f in the classroom the opposite. I'm a lucky Prathom teacher though and as for marking all done in class hours for all exams and no other marking involved generally. As for outside the class prep very minimal as we 'follow a book' and after 4 years of this book well it ain't rocket science anymore. End result: teach, go home, pretty much forget about it. ....not every teaching slot though eh. GL Mista.
     
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  11. Tonyja

    Tonyja Well-Known Member

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    For me the same reasons for the lack of prepping. Of my 15 years here more than half have been in government schools so it's all a bit the same.
    The best advice is just get your first year in, then you'll have some experience for yourself and it looks good on your cv that you've finished a contract for future employees.
    Don't worry, there's plenty of lebegers out there making the rest of us look great.
     
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  12. Mr 1984

    Mr 1984 Thread Starter New Member

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    What's a prathom teacher?
     
  13. SundayJam

    SundayJam Well-Known Member

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    Annuban= kindergarten
    Prathom= grade school/primary
    Matthayom= middle school and high school
     
  14. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    Lower Prathomsuksa from grade 1 to 3, upper Prathomsuksa from grade 4 to 6, then

    Lower Mathayom from grade 7 to 9 and upper Matthayom from grade 10 to 12.

    Please see attachment with some more details, sorry wasn't a masterpiece. :cursing

    Education Thailand_001.png
     

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