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work permit mandatory retirement

Discussion in 'Work permits' started by gungchang, 14 May 2015.

  1. gungchang

    gungchang Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Three different people have all told me that mandatory retirement is 60 and either that a work permit cannot be done or that it's very unusual for it to be done.

    It just dawned on me that I was sixty years and nine months old when my most recent work permit was issued.

    This leads me to wonder about a couple of things.

    1) Is the mandatory retirement regulation only just now being enforced?

    2) Could my teaching license, which did not expire on my 60th birthday and runs until I'm over 64, be grandfathering me and extending my retirement age to 64?

    I'm asking because I have a few job offers. The agent that has two of the jobs flatly says that there can be no work permit. The third job offer is a school trying to do a direct hire for the first time. They've never done a WP. They're certainly eager to do so, but they'll be in uncharted territory. I might be asked to help guide them.

    All thoughts are welcome.
     
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  2. steveolevi

    steveolevi Well-Known Member

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    I'd like to pose another question regarding Social Security: If someone has been teaching since age 50, for example, then there would be no way to make it to the 15 years (180 months) needed to qualify for social security (old age benefits) and medical insurance continuing into retirement ??
     
    Last edited: 15 May 2015
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  3. Gor Blimey Guvnur!

    Gor Blimey Guvnur! What the duck ! Staff Member

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    It does appear vague as to what 'they' say or 'they' require. I can only add that one teacher I know of is 77 years old and has a work permit, but then he also has a residency permit too .... maybe one affects the other as a possibility ...or... in my home town wp office they are lax ??
     
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  4. luibkk

    luibkk Well-Known Member

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    AFAIK ( you gotta be careful in Thailand) there is no age limit for foreign teachers. I got a WP at the age of 61 without the license so there is no relation there either. I also know a few guys over 60 who have a WP without the license or a resident status.
    Steveolevi: the 15 years are mandatory to get retirement benefits which are quite low I think. A teacher who started at the age of 50 could manage to pay in for 15 years if he is continuously employed after he turned 60. One day unemployed and he is out. However, the 15 years are not necessary to stay in the system (health insurance) after retirement. If one has been in the system for more than 12 months and retires or stops working, he can continue as a private person paying the contribution of 400 something THB monthly.
    Hope this answers your question.
    P.S. I got my last WP 4 weeks ago at the age of 62.
     
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  5. gungchang

    gungchang Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Maybe my wife should tag along to the labor office and show some cleavage?

    [​IMG]

    It might work.
     
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  6. steveolevi

    steveolevi Well-Known Member

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    Thanks Luibkk. You cleared up a lot. In regards to the social security old age benefits, I believe that after 180 months of paying into the system the employee is entitled to a monthly payment of 20% of the previous 5 years monthly salary.
    For example, a salary of 30K per month for the last 5 years would net 6K per month in old age benefits upon retirement. If the employee had a raise in pay or his salary had changed, up or down during those last 5 years, then the average would be used to calculate the monthly old age benefit payment.
     
    Last edited: 15 May 2015
  7. luibkk

    luibkk Well-Known Member

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    I'm not sure about your calculation since the premium the employer and you pay is calculated for a salary of 15k max. Hence I suppose the old age benefits are calculated using this maximum salary too but I don't really know. It wouldn't make much sense for the SS to get only 1200 or 1500 THB monthly ( not sure what the percentage is atm) and after 15 years pay out 20,000 monthly because the employee had a salary of 100,000 THB per month.
     
  8. steveolevi

    steveolevi Well-Known Member

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    I see. I was under the impression that it was just a simple calculation. I hadn't considered a hig salary like 100K. I guess the answer would be to contact the SS office. I'll be going over there soon and I'll ask and report back.
     
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  9. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    I know a English lady in our town who is 63 years old. She is at her fourth year at the school. She couldn't get a next provisional teaching permit because she doesn't hold a degree. School arranged that she became educational personnel according to Reason of Necessity 2.7 In the case of a teacher, professor, expert or educational personnel in a private educational institution despite the school being a government school. She got her extension of stay based on employment and her work permit. :yes
     
  10. luibkk

    luibkk Well-Known Member

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    That would be great to know. Thanks.
     
  11. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

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    as much as it kills me to say this after all the hours of study for the TCT tests….. comparison to other in this kingdom provides little. "but i know a man who…" will get you nowhere fast.

    I am very sorry for the negativity but your case your day,your meeting with the power thats be. :thai wai I wish there were more uniformity
     
  12. daiwill

    daiwill Member

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    I have also been told that it has to be 15 years continuous employment to qualify for a Thai pension , therefore what happens when it can take a school or other academic employer up to 3 months+ to get your extensions and WPs sorted out at any new place of work you may change to, during those 15 years.
    Additionally, what is the personal reference number used by the office dealing with these payment / deductions and how do you find that number.
    What if you have worked in different regions , do they still use the same personal reference number , like they would back in the UK with a National Insurance Number?????
    I have had many deductions being made in to the Thai Social Security System, presumably for health care and pension in the future, but I have no idea what my number is or whether or not my money is really going in there.

    I think I know which office it is, but have no idea how they would trace my payments into the system, which have been made in other areas of Thailand, as I don't know my own reference number or if they can even check that sort of thing ???
     
  13. luibkk

    luibkk Well-Known Member

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    I am not an expert on these questions but I can tell you what I believe to know. If you want specific answers, ask your local Social Security Office.
    Your employer enrolls you in the Social Security Scheme and you should get a card with your number shortly after. You also have to choose the hospital you want to use.
    Regarding the pension or retirement benefits I think you don't need 15 years of continuous employment but rather 180 months of paid contributions to the SS scheme so there can be periods of no payments.
    Go to your local Social Security Office and ask them about your number, your SS card and a list of the contributions you and your employer have made over the years.
    The best thing about the SS is imo that they pay back almost all of your contributions, mind not the ones your employer made, when you stop working or retire.
    You see it's worth the effort to find out about your status in the SS system. Maybe your employers scammed you by taking the money out of your salary and never paid the SS office or perhaps they did everything correctly without your knowledge.
    Go and find out.
     
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  14. chuachinsoon

    chuachinsoon Well-Known Member

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    You need to inform them if you're not working, but you still need to make monthly contributions by yourself. Just the minimum amount.
     
  15. steveolevi

    steveolevi Well-Known Member

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    Correct!

    I hadn't heard this. I have seen the printout from SS on my own contributions and after 9 years, I have nearly 100k banked from my contributions + employer, or so the printout says. I thought that it was a 1 baht to 1 baht matching (employee/employer)

    I'm going to SS soon and I'll report back.
     
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