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I've taken the plunge. I'm going to study Thai.

Discussion in 'Thai Language' started by Stamp, 2 Jul 2013.

  1. chuachinsoon

    chuachinsoon Well-Known Member

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    I've got one from an Aussie Uni. I did some courses on history, economics, politics. Unfortunately a lot of the Asian courses are focused on India, China, Japan, and to a very limited extent, SEA. It was fun though, because I was able to read some books which I would not have been able to find in my country. Not banned, just ... unavailable. :innocent:
    The fun bit was actually being able to access the library - it's supposed to be the biggest library in the southern hemisphere. Unfortunately they didn't have a lot of books about Thailand - just the SEA region.

    I also did 3 years of Thai language. The classes also involved learning Thai culture. It was hard because I couldn't find many people to practice with. There were quite a lot of Thais in my uni but very few had the patience to explain simple Thai to me. I also did Biblical Hebrew for 2 years but I barely passed it. The grammar's worse than Thai. Really.

    So there you have it. Three years of Asian Studies in uni before coming to Thailand to get a really good dose of Asian-ness.
     
  2. chrgrims

    chrgrims New Member

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    The document is a declaration regarding giving work permits to foreign teachers who doesnt have a work permit (i think they mean license from krusapa here). it basically states that its legal to give a work permit to foreign teachers if certain specified criteria are met.

    Here are some of the key words/sentences in the document:

    kam ki jeng declaration

    gan ok nang seu anoyat hai chao dtang pratet pragob vichachip kru doi mai mee bai anoyadt pragob vichachip
    Literally: issue workpermit book for foreigners for teaching profession without workpermit for occupation.
    I think this means issue workpermit for foreign teachers who doesnt have a krusapa license.

    nang seu anoyat hai chao dtang pratet pragob vichachip kro doi mai mee bai anoyat pragob vichachip
    literally: work permit book to give foreign teachers who doesnt have work permit for teaching. same meaning.

    mai chai bai anoyat pragop vichachip kro dte bpen nang seu ti hai vai peua
    sadeng hua bokkon ti dai rap anoyadt bpen pomisit pragop vichachip kru dai
    it is not a work permit for teacher, but it is document that is given (for a long time)
    for showing that this person that receive this permission have the right for a teacher
    occupation.


    pai dtai paratcha banyat under kings law/order
    sapa counsel/ department/parlament

    bokalagon staff
    tang gan suk sa educational
    paa saa law year issued

    hai get present
    satan suksa educational establishment/ schools
    rong kaa petition
    gorani in case
    jang hire
    patibat to act

    laggen criteria
    gan pitjarana consideration
    gamnod specifiy
    grop frame
    dang me as follows


    mee konawot qualification
    tiep tao equivalent
    chamnan skillfull
    satan suk saa school
    patibat action
    nati duty

    wat measure
    saharat anajag united kingdom
    bri ten britain
    krea rat australia
    yao kong pasa native language
    laksana characteristic
    matra 44 act 44 (law number)
    paracha banyat under kings order


    NOTICE: This translation is not in any way guaranteed to be correct. It was translated with the purpose of learning thai and to help others on this forum to learn thai.
     
  3. Mati

    Mati Well-Known Member

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    I am very impressed with the quality of Thai language study on this forum. It makes me want to dive in starting with the cool alphabet song ;)
     
  4. Stamp

    Stamp Thread Starter Administrator Staff Member

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    Just ago, I've finalised the schedule with my Thai colleague.

    Monday 09:20 - 10:10 h, Tuesday 11:10 - 12:00 h and Friday 13:00 - 13:50 h. We'll start next week. :celebrate:
     
  5. Mati

    Mati Well-Known Member

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    Chok Dee Ka, Satamp.
     
  6. Heiko

    Heiko is a computer buff

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    I am totally fluent in some situation e.g. buying food, paying bills.
    But too often I literally hit the WALL. I don't have the time anymore, because ...
    I have started to learn Standard Chinese five weeks ago. It is cruel, funny and interesting.
    Thai pronunciation is easy compared to Chinese!

    Cheers,
    Heiko
     
  7. Mati

    Mati Well-Known Member

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    Interesting, Heiko, maybe for that same reason you would find your Thai Walls disappear? Another language I would like to dig into is Mandarin, I like drawing ;)
     
  8. Stamp

    Stamp Thread Starter Administrator Staff Member

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    I try and try..........

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk 21373112831.078312.jpg

    ImageUploadedByTapatalk 21373112831.078312.jpg
     
    Last edited by a moderator: 26 Apr 2015
  9. chuachinsoon

    chuachinsoon Well-Known Member

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    Maybe. But in terms of the written language, Thai has an alphabet. Chinese doesn't. So Thai is easier to read than Chinese... except when they use those fancy fonts in adverts.
     
  10. crew

    crew Faber College Member

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    ouch.
    i've never had an issue hearing and speaking the five thai tones.

    does anyone know if being "tone deaf" really has an affect on hearing spoken tones within a language? i hear people claiming this is why they can't speak thai very well and i always assumed tone deaf was unique to musical tones.
     
  11. ramses

    ramses Well-Known Member

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    I have a horrible time replicating the tones if I do not know which tone I am replicating. Once an NTS has modeled a word for me (exaggerating the tones only slightly), I do an OK job of saying the word.

    Not too much, I can hear the tones, but I have a hard time mimicking new words I have heard just a couple times.

    never gave it much thought, but I do speak Thai much better than I sing, so there must be a small nugget of truth to it.

    For those who are tone-deaf, it could simply be a self fulfilling prophecy. They are convinced they can not before they even have a chance to try to learn the language.
     
  12. tiredtony

    tiredtony Well-Known Member

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    For me the tones came easily. I taught myself and the best way in my opinion is to drill a bunch of words with all the same tone.
     
  13. chrgrims

    chrgrims New Member

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    from personal experience i think ability to hear tones and ability to learn a tonal language is related for sure. i used to be a music producer and pretty good at distinguishing tones. i think that helped me a lot with the tones in thai. but the tones are only a small part of thai, so its only gonna help you so far.
     
  14. Boyd

    Boyd New Member

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    good for you my friend
     
    Makaveli likes this.
  15. Meanjin

    Meanjin Active Member

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    I would think that ability to recognize the tones is an aspect of auditory discrimination, and I think it's something we all have unless we suffer a degree of hearing loss.

    As we know from our students, the ability to demonstrate auditory discrimination by repeating a word correctly or by identifying the correct sound in a minimal pair, etc, can take a while, but the ability to remember different sounds and the ability to hear them in the first place are perhaps two different things. And if so, a person who says he/she has difficulty "hearing" the Thai tones correctly may in fact just have difficulty in remembering them and being able to repeat them or recognize them later. Does that make sense?

    I think Ramses' suggestion that for some it's a self-fulfilling prophecy has merit. Krashen spoke of the affective filter as an inhibitor in learning language, and I think this is what Ramses is alluding to.
     

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