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How to Arrive at a New School--the lone foreign teacher

Discussion in 'Welcome Newbies' started by DavidUSA, 28 Apr 2016.

  1. ramses

    ramses Well-Known Member

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    I wasn't referencing any theory. just responding to the comment about geographical proximity.
     
  2. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    "To be fair, there is a narrative that is pushed about the history of Thailand's sovereignty. It is found in American propaganda, and elsewhere."


    Interesting. I have wondered about this.
     
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  3. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Handing out little snacks is a good idea.
     
  4. Fatty

    Fatty Member

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    You're braver than me. I could never be the only 'Mr Farang' in the school/area. I would only work at a school that had at least a couple of other western teachers who had worked at the school for at least a little while (a good sign, usually).
     
  5. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    I was stupid enough to quit my old position just to start at a school that had an agent who sent some brave teachers from Cameroon, then some Asians, but none had an idea what to do.

    I was the first white man with the unbelievable task to set up an EP. 39 students in the EP and not more than 25 in the ordinary classes.

    I'd already left the interview when they offered me less money what I already had, including a secure job.

    On my way back, only right around the corner then the phone rang: " The director wants you, please come back."

    Stupid as I am, I turned around and drove back, just to hear of an 11 month contract. Then I stood up again and wanted to leave.

    I didn't listen to the warning signs and went from heaven to hell. At my foirmer school i could hang out in my huge house on campus with a nice carport and free internet from a nearby hotel.

    At my current school I constantly have around 10,000 decibel noise all day long, not really an office and need to walk a long way to have a Buri.

    The lone foreigner pure. I missed my American colleague who'd left the school short before me, with had a Master's from the States and signed up for 26 K/month.

    I still miss Ubon Ratchathani and hate all the school gossip, much younger Thai teachers who wai me like I'm a little student. I hate my life and what I've done to it. ( Stolen from Neil Young..)

    Dear OP, I know exactly where you're coming from and totally agree that it's a nice sign to see some guys there who speak your language and worked there for a couple of years.

    I feel like an exotic monkey in an unreal zoo. Sorry, there aren't the right words to describe it.

    In addition a fingerprint scanner, the school 24 km away from my door and when others just sign in and go back home, I have to hang out there all day long. Wouldn't make much sense to drive back and waste a lot of cash for Diesel oil.

    I did listen to a guy who I thought would be a friend. "You'd be so stupid not to take this job, think about it, you can sleep at home every day, etc..yep, cool, but 3 to 4 K go away for gasoline.

    It took me a long time to find out what an idiot the guy really is. A pathological liar and psychopath.

    But the daily meetings and Archa beer weren't good for my brain, I guess.

    Life goes on, no matter how deep the shit is some people have to walk in. Cheers and greetings to China. Niehau Maa.
     
  6. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    I won't do it again. But I definitely learned (finally) how it is better to keep one's head down and not be Mr. Friendly to everyone from day one.

    Hesitant to recall anything I learned in the US Army, it goes like this: when you are put into a new group of people the first thing you must do if find out who despises whom.

    Staying in one's lane is best, especially when one is in a truly foreign environment.
     
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