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Hi All Teachers!! Chang here

Discussion in 'Welcome Newbies' started by Khoo Chang Yew, 10 Nov 2015.

  1. Khoo Chang Yew

    Khoo Chang Yew Thread Starter New Member

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    Hi All!!!

    I'm Chang and I have been reading on all Teaching in Thailand related information and I came across this forum.

    Been trying to help a friend to settle down in Thailand as a teacher and I also am interested in the teaching scene in Thailand. This forum does have really up to date information and discussion.

    Let's try to keep this forum alive. Maybe we can have meetups with some of the fellow teachers. Not easy to be a teacher in a foreign land and we should network more to keep the teaching scene ALIVE!!

    Cheers/.
     
  2. Teacher MARK

    Teacher MARK Banned

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    [​IMG]

    What difficulties are you facing? Maybe we can help. :smile
     
  3. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    :welcome2
     
  4. BBob

    BBob New Member

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    Hello
     
    Last edited: 17 Mar 2016
  5. BBob

    BBob New Member

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  6. BBob

    BBob New Member

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  7. dave123

    dave123 Smurf Diver

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    Dated Nov 2015

    Well he really is helping 5555555555555555
     
  8. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Well-Known Member

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    This website is especially useful if you teach out in the boondocks of Thailand and you want to have some contact with your peers. If you read through the postings on this site, you are going to gain an accurate and helpful view of what is going on with English education in Thailand. Perhaps more importantly, you will find some tips on how to live there and avoid pitfalls.

    Whatever else you do, make sure that your contract clearly states how much you will be paid for any extra classes that might come up. Also make sure that your contract has a clause about how it cannot be changed without your permission. After you sign that paper, take it for granted that someone is going to be staying up very late at night trying to figure out how to get a cut from your paycheck. Take that for granted, be ready for it, and try to head it off at the pass. Laos is worse, from what I hear. But you could also say it is just human nature. My experience, which I admit is just a series of snapshots over a few years in one location, tells me that skimming is normal. But others from different cities have told me the same thing about where they work.

    Other than that you will see that most people have a positive experience overall. For some, it is extremely positive, and you might end up being one of those people who fall in love with the place. Let me add one other tidbit: Thailand is a good place to keep your head on your shoulders as far as safety goes. I am talking about driving or riding a motorbike or bicycle (all can be extremely dangerous) and how alcohol seems to lead to trouble. Medical care outside of a few urban areas can be straight up Congo, and that is something to keep in mind. I got attacked by some dogs and bitten one night (riding a bicycle), and I had to go to the emergency room. I got there and two feral dogs were wandering around the table I lay on--inside the hospital, inside the emergency room. The "doctor" was shuffling her slipper-shod feet across the dirty floor to the moans of the poor fellow next to me. She was checking her phone, probably FaceBook. A few months later, an American girl, a teacher, was similarly attacked while headed home boozed up after a night on the town (village). She managed to break her back (that little bone at the bottom) and dislocate her shoulder and hip. The "hospital" did not even x-ray her. They did not diagnose either the broken bone or the dislocations. She could not walk. Mom and dad panicked back in the States and they shelled out some cash to rescue her. Do you see my point? Problems cascade until they become serious (no animal control > getting drunk at night > poor to non-existent medical care > a culture of keeping bad news tamped down). Be careful. Oh, did the Thai folks tell the girl's replacement (a person who rolled into town all bright-eyed and fresh about six months later) about the dog attack? Did they tell the new girl to avoid drinking and riding a bike at night because dogs might want to jump her? Did they tell her that if she needed medical care she should go to Bangkok or Udon Thani? Did our hosts tell her that a nutcase was riding around at night with a knife and he liked to slash anyone he came across?

    No, but I did.

    P.S. Nakhon Phanom's slasher is now part of the collective memory. In an amazing instance of justice, he got rolled up and law-abiding folks got to see his sad, little face on TV. Good riddance. The dogs, on the other hand, are probably as frisky as ever.

    cat.jpg
     
    Last edited: 9 May 2016
    sirchai likes this.

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