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Five Full-time Teaching Positions in China + Housing + Flight Bonus

Discussion in 'Teaching Jobs You Know Of' started by DavidUSA, 3 Jul 2016.

  1. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Positions: Elementary School Teacher (2), Middle School and High School Teacher (3); Private Company
    Location: Huai'an, Jiangsu Province, China; It's a city of 2.5 million, north of Nanjing.
    Responsibilities: Teaching 20-22 lessons per week (40-50 minutes each) + office hours + company meetings for a total of 40 hours per week. During the summer the number of teaching hours increases, but overtime can be earned. The focus of the teaching will be on speaking practice.
    Salary: 40,300 Baht to 50,500 Baht (converted to today's exchange rate) per month after taxes (8,000 to 10,000 Yuan before tax, per month) based on experience
    Benefits: health insurance, housing with free utilities (up to a reasonable point) and free internet, a free flight home once a year or $1,000 US, overtime paid at the rate of 1,070 Baht per hour. The Chinese Residence Permit, Foreign Expert Certificate, and health check are paid for by the school.
    Vacations: around ten days in late January (exact time varies by year), around ten days in late August, one full week in the beginning of October, one week in the middle of October, various national holidays
    Professionalism: You will be working as a member of a teaching team. The English Department has about 40 teachers. Your peers and the senior staff will critique your teaching during mock lessons that you will present once a week. Standards are very high. All teachers regularly take tests on the finer points of English grammar. Senior staff will walk through lessons and mentor incoming teachers. Every lesson is presented beforehand, evaluated, and refined.
    Minimum Qualifications: NES with a BA degree in any field from an accredited institution of higher learning, TEFL/TESOL, one year of teaching experience, a clean background check, clear pronunciation, and a solid understanding of English grammar
    Preferred Qualifications: two or more years of pertinent teaching experience; a BA in Education, English, or Childhood Education
    Age: 30-55 years old (with some flexibility for an ideal candidate)
    Start Date: 1 September, 2016
    Contact: here; For the time being, these positions are only being offered on this website.

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    This is the company I work for in China. You will be walking into a professional environment. One big advantage you have in accepting work with these people is that you have me, an American, their first foreign teacher, to tell you the real deal and smooth the move to China. Today I made an off-hand remark when the head of the English Department said she needed to hire some more native-speaking English teachers. I asked her if I could get first shot at finding some. She said yes.

    If you are interested, get your paperwork together and write me. If you do not have a real degree, please do not apply. The Chinese will scrutinize your credentials.

    It is a good job in a good place with a low cost of living. There are small perks which are not listed, such as some meals and vacation money, and an extra day off here and there. There will also be a guaranteed pay raise for those who sign again, but that exact amount is not yet set in stone. It will probably be 10%. They don't play games with your pay or benefits, and the standards are high across the board. The free housing is sparkling clean and peaceful. The Chinese make it easy to bring one's family, another big plus. Thailand is not that far away, lots of flights from Nanjing and Shanghai.

    Huai'an is not a party town. It is not a booming metropolis. They call it a small town. Not a whole lot of foreign faces. It is really China. I have been treated well since the moment I got here. I am not waving their red flag. I am just saying how it is. I bet they will give you some money for expenses once you arrive, ask what you need, take you out to eat, etc. That is how they are.

    Write with your CV if you are interested, and I will hand your info off to the HR department in the coming two weeks. If you want to send your CV encrypted, then please tell me and we will set that up with my Hushmail or Tutanota.

    The name of the company is Jia Yi Education. As we speak, it is going international.
     
    Last edited: 3 Jul 2016
    sirchai, gungchang, portnoy58 and 2 others like this.
  2. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Two positions are going to start on 1 January, 2017.
     
  3. ramses

    ramses Well-Known Member

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    the lack of an extended break is a bit daunting (2x2 week breaks, 2x1week breaks), my experience was that is I did not do any OT teaching (different province different company) I worked about 170 - 180 days - somewhat congruent to a thai calendar.

    If the company gives ong pao to its employees, that could also be very nice. & finally there is a lot of prestige afforded the foreign teachers (ime 10+ years ago). I think I had written elsewhere that I seldom picked up my own tab at a KTV or restaurant if i crossed paths with someone I knew.

    fwiw, this seems to be a bigger outfit with more foreigners, so not likely the oddity I was (and GC is), but I can't imagine a teacher who fits that bill not being well received by the community.

    spoiler alert - the chinese know they can drink you under the table, and they will make a point of proving it. A mate who taught in Japan while I was in China tells stories of businessmen showing up to class on monday absolutely wrecked. when asked about it, they would reply they had been in China over the weekend.
     
    GanDoonToonPet likes this.
  4. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    I did get invited out for a meal that turned into a drinking contest, but I don't take this stuff seriously. If you weigh 210 lbs, and they weigh 90 lbs each, and you can make a bottle of vodka disappear as if it were Kool Aid, they don't have a chance. After five years of drinking with Russians, drinking as if it were an Olympic training event requiring focus, dedication, daily practice (morning, noon, and night), and natural ability, there is not much to say. They have news stories like this: drunk guy gets hit by a drunk driver, the ambulance comes, the medics are drunk, get to the hospital, doctor is drunk.The Russians have a word for a drinking bout that lasts several days in which you stay hammered: "za-poy." In another fun factoid, I once paced off the length of the vodka section in a big grocery store. Vodka, of every kind, from floor to ceiling, thirty-one meters of it.

    It is true that a lot of Japanese guys (and gals--God bless them) like to get plastered--it is part of their business culture. Although it is true that many Chinese love the sacred grape and they cherish their white wine fire water, it is the Russian power drinkers, at least in my experience, who love drinking most, to get torn from the frame (and fight), to just pour it down their throats and try to overcome their ultra-high tolerance. Then the internal alligator quickly comes out, nothing to be proud of. Quite a few Brits like to drink and fight, but with the Russians it is different: once you are helpless and on the ground the real fight begins. (Reminds me of that awful incident where the Thais are kicking the British lady who was on the ground, a bunch of cowards) Americans don't generally play that, but fighting is not recommended because we carry guns and we use Gun-fu at the slightest provocation. The Chinese I know are innocent in comparison. Men bragging about how much they can drink just demonstrates how dumb they are. But you are right, quite a few Chinese guys evidently pride themselves on how many bottles they can put away.
     

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