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Entry level Benz in Thailand

Discussion in 'Travel' started by bahn_farang, 12 Dec 2016.

  1. Wangsuda

    Wangsuda Nonentity Staff Member

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    The import anything tax here is insane. The new motorcycle I want to buy is slapped with an overall tax of 265%. Insane indeed.
     
  2. SageAdvice

    SageAdvice Well-Known Member

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    Aren't locally assembled motorbikes up to snuff? Do they lack style? Cachet? Power? Drawing power?
     
  3. Wangsuda

    Wangsuda Nonentity Staff Member

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    You can say the exact thing about cars and trucks. Locally assembled transportation products can get you from point A to point B. My locally assembled Honda does just that. But this thread is not about needs. It is about wants.
     
  4. SageAdvice

    SageAdvice Well-Known Member

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    Yes, that is what my questions aim to uncover. What's missing with local products: style? cachet? power?
     
  5. Wangsuda

    Wangsuda Nonentity Staff Member

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    Style and uniqueness.
     
  6. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    I beg to differ. Whether a vehicle can be build in Thailand depends on the expected sales volume related to plant capacity, means of production and further economics. Mini Coopers for example are build AFAIK in England, Austria, Netherlands and Thailand.

    What's the main difference between locally assembled vehicles and those in the country of origin - I believe it's quality.
     
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  7. SageAdvice

    SageAdvice Well-Known Member

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    Won't foreign vehicle manufacturers (many of whom export from Thailand) impose the same quality assurance programs here as they would in their home countries? If not, manufacturing in Thailand would be self-defeating commercially, much like the Proton experience.
     
  8. portnoy58

    portnoy58 Well-Known Member

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    ... you weren't with Addison Lee by any chance were you?! I lived in this car for a couple of years and loved every minute of it.
     
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  9. Hey_ewe

    Hey_ewe Well-Known Member

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    No, I was a government contractor. I’d never really been that fussed about mercs before but this car converted me. It was a beautiful car, the first car I’ve had that parked itself...a little unnerving at first. The thing I liked the most was the lights, even the way they turned off in stages was ‘a bit special’ and I’m glad to see that more manufacturers are introducing the led piping style lights. They are really bright for safety but look really sexy too.
     
  10. SundayJam

    SundayJam Well-Known Member

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    I'm from Maui. I say go for the Honda or Toyota...Hyundai...whatever. The premium paid is just not worth it.
     
  11. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    I'm from London (relevance ???). I say chase your dreams within reality. Without want is a very sad individual. The OP was about wants not needs. As a 40ish male who works a little too much to provide, whats wrong with a little self reward. Having said that spending a little extra to eat a pig cooked underground would also be a luxury. Aloha.
     
  12. Hey_ewe

    Hey_ewe Well-Known Member

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    I suppose it just comes down to personal choice. Some want high end luxury other will opt for a utilitarian vehicle to get them from A to B. I’d love an E class merc but not one that costs more than my house. Cars in Thailand are starting to depreciate at a quicker rate than they had in the past.

    It would be nice to have a few more realistic choices, instead of the handful of manufacturers that have an effective monopoly on the Thai car market. The premium you pay on some fairly standard cars is unbelievable, the mazda mx5 is 2.7mb in the UK you can buy one for 800,000 baht.

    We will be in the market for a car in a year or so and I personally want some degree of comfort and high end safety specs. The newer Toyotas, Nissans etc. are much more comfortable inside than they used to be. Ford are actually pretty decent, I like the focus but I wish they’d sell the diesel Mondeo here. Diesel cars in general here seem to be a rarity, I did notice that the mazda 2 has a diesel option but its a bit small for our needs. One car that has caught our eye is the volvo v40 but it's a bit steep at 1.7mb. For that price I could buy a top the range ford everest.

    01-2017-volvo-v40-geneva-1.jpg
     
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  13. Gor Blimey Guvnur!

    Gor Blimey Guvnur! What the duck ! Staff Member

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    Mad eh and an overly protective car market. My mom in the UK has an MX5 just over 1 million baht (higher spec).

    Minis make me laugh here, 2 million baht for a car that is 'ordinary' yet considered hi-so by many Thais .... just the price tag eh. Entry Merc or entry Mini cooper for the same price (@2.1 mill) ...now that doesn't make any sense eh.
     
  14. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA την σκαφην σκαφην λεγοντας

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    What a striking sentence! Its form and meaning go together extremely well. To dream goes with perhaps. Using to + infinitive as a complement is quite surprising, but the surprise reinforces the meaning of dream because dreams can be surprising (and we do not usually think of dreaming as beneficial). Using that empty subject it emphasizes a benefit of living in Thailand, but the weight of the sentence goes to the end, another small surprise. Then the reader is invited to soak it in, wonder if it is true, wonder what his Thailand-induced dreams are. It is concise; it ends well. It is spot on as an introduction to what he wrote.

    The tone is somewhat literary, but it does not sound fake and it comes across well. Notice the fall of the stresses.

    If you switch that sentence around, its appeal collapses, its suggestiveness disappears:

    Dreaming is a benefit of living in Thailand. (using the gerund makes it sound ridiculous)
    Dreaming is, perhaps, a benefit of living in Thailand.
    To dream is, perhaps, a benefit of living in Thailand. (the stresses are awkward, the poetic effect is lost)
    To dream is a benefit, perhaps, of living in Thailand. (the focus on the intentionality of to + infinitive is lost)
    Perhaps, it is a benefit of of living in Thailand to dream. (this does not establish the voice of the speaker)
     
    Last edited: 18 Dec 2016
  15. SageAdvice

    SageAdvice Well-Known Member

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    *cough*...another lost weekend then :smiling.
     

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