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Corruption Advice from Dear Abby

Discussion in 'The Teachers Lounge' started by SageAdvice, 17 Dec 2016.

  1. SageAdvice

    SageAdvice Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    DEAR ABBY: I have a problem and no clue how to solve it. I teach in an international primary school in China, and was approached by the father of one of my students. I had given her a “C” in the class.

    Her father wanted me to change her grade to an “A.” He felt that a “C” was too low a mark, even though I explained it was what she deserved.

    While parents complaining about their children’s marks is not uncommon, he offered me about $1,000 in local currency if I would change it. When I spoke about it to another teacher who has been here longer, he told me that bribery is very common in Asia. He did not mention whether he had ever accepted “gifts” like this.

    What should I do? Accepting and not accepting this “gift” both have consequences. — TEACHER IN CHINA

    DEAR TEACHER: There is tremendous pressure on students in China to excel. What you have described may be common practice there, but that doesn’t mean you must do it. If you accept the bribe, you will not only have violated your own principles, but may also make yourself vulnerable to blackmail in the future.

    Discuss this with the principal or director of the primary school, because if the school turns out incompetent graduates, eventually its reputation will suffer.
     
  2. portnoy58

    portnoy58 Well-Known Member

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    Can a stand alone primary grade really have so much significance in these times and in an international school?

    There is something inherently wrong with any education system that allows life-changing judgements to be made at the age of eleven or thereabouts. Hence the abolition of the English/Welsh '11 plus' and Scottish Qualifying Exam in the early 1970s - an IQ test, masquerading as an English and Maths test, which was taken by students aged eleven; its results were used to stream people's education according to their so called ability. The top tier went to grammar schools and were prepared for university entrance, a second tier went to comprehensive schools with more of a vocational bent etc. It was iniquitous as young people's futures were in effect determined at the age of eleven. Of course not all local authorities in the UK abolished it and our dear friends the Conservative Party are attempting to reintroduce it.

    So I would say the father has the right approach to this matter of grading and Iwould suggest you take the bribe without any further ado! In the interests of fairness I suggest all children receive an A grade ....
     
    sirchai likes this.
  3. SageAdvice

    SageAdvice Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Such a suggestion further suggests that parents and teachers begin negotiating sessions early in the term to ensure all kiddies are star performers :smiling.
     
  4. stfranalum

    stfranalum Well-Known Member

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    if you're going to take the dive, why merely accept his initial offer? :-D
     
    fred flintstone likes this.
  5. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    Why not donating the money to poor people in Thailand? You will, of course, get a receipt.

    ( Just in case if somebody's trying to blackmail you)

    When people can basically buy their grades, teachers finally create a "no fail system:" that's well known in a particular country.

    Is it really fair to those who really learn and do all their assignments? It's not about money now.

    What if the grade A student fails in all tests? I'd think twice.
     

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