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A question for the China gang

Discussion in 'Travel' started by OxfordDon, 28 Jan 2017.

  1. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Well-Known Member

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    I don't know, but I think it will be amazing to have this project completed and be able to take the train from China to Thailand through Laos.
    Some articles about it.
    China-Thailand Rail Project Back on Track With Cost Agreement | The Diplomat

    Thailand, China agree on $5 billion cost for rail project's first phase| Reuters

    According to this article, Thailand wants to modernize it's railway. I totally agree that Thailand needs to modernize the trains as they are very slow and unreliable which you also mentioned, Sirchai.
     
  2. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Well-Known Member

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    It opened in 2007. I"m surprised you just heard about it. ;)
     
  3. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA Well-Known Member

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    China is a nice place to teach English. But...

    It is also chaotic and suffers from an inability to do just about anything with precision or grace. They like to take shortcuts on safety--especially when money is involved. Am I going to trust their new train? Heck no. They think faster is better. No, fast is good, but safe is best. Even simple actions can become chaotic and unpleasant in China (checking into a hotel; riding in a taxi), and I am not going to gamble with my life. Airlines, on the other hand, have improved over time, and many are up to international standards. Chinese airlines used to be awful, but now many of them are excellent, as far as safety and service go.

    New Chinese train that goes 430 km/hr? Good luck with that. Better wait and see if it survives its long hauls before one jumps on for a ride to Kunming.
     
  4. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    Hi Dave,

    They actually make the 450 km/h mark. I'm one of the guys who grew up in the country where the technology was invented and most Germans were more than irritated when the "Transrapid" ( the first name of the test train) finally didn't make it.

    The test area wasn't too long, so there must have been a problem with the reliability, otherwise, you'd see them on German railways.

    Let's say a magnetic field stops functioning when a train drives a fourth of the speed of light. What would happen to the train and its passengers?

    I mean there are no wheels, no security system and even parachutes wouldn't be helpful, as far as I see it.

    I don't want to post train accident photos of high-speed trains from China here, please Google them.

    Too many of them have made it through the news and I was shocked about the mentality to sweep so much under a carpet.

    And without any Thai bashing now, not even my father in law's buffaloes would get me on a high-speed train, driven by a Thai.

    I remember an article in the Bangkok post when they were seeking german train drivers for the MRT and Skytrain in Bangkok after an accident because the driver had switched off the electronic that would have prevented the accident.

    The trains are made by Siemens and Thyssen Krupp ( ex-tank and WW II weapon producers) with all security measures built in that an accident because of another train on the railway could never happen.

    But I'm afraid that some people in this country would switch such very important stuff off without knowing the consequences.

    Holy cow, I've now found what I was looking for and I guess it's THE explanation why the wanted Munich Transrapid never got into service:

    " German engineering giants Siemens and ThyssenKrupp developed the project. So far, the technology has not been broadly adopted due to safety concerns. In September 2006, 23 people died and 11 were injured when a Transrapid crashed into a maintenance vehicle during a test run near the western German city of Osnabrück.

    Currently only China has an operational Transrapid track. It runs between Shanghai and the city's airport. "

    Please see:

    Transrapid Train Hits the Fast Track in Munich | Germany | DW.COM | 25.09.2007


    The good and the bad.jpg
     
  5. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Well-Known Member

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    There have certainly been lots of train accidents. The Wenzhou train incident comes to mind in 2011 when 40 people were killed and 200 injured. However, that was the last big train wreck. I feel pretty safe on the trains here in China. The Maglev has been running since 2007 and has had no incidents. Plus, it doesn't run too far (7 minutes from point A to point B). Yes, I agree that there are delays and chaos with train travel, because I've travelled during Chinese New Year and can attest to the madness.

    There are always lots of delays with Chinese airlines and accidents have improved over time, but still exist.

    I will still take the train because I believe that train travel is becoming safer as well and you can see the country. I like the convenience of flying, but if I had the time I would take the train. The train from Beijing to Shanghai is a must do. The scenery is spectacular. Don't limit yourself, David ;).

    List of rail accidents in China - Wikipedia

    China Airlines - Wikipedia
     
    DavidUSA likes this.

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