1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

9 million children living in rural China have been abandoned by their parents

Discussion in 'General News from other countries' started by Internationalteacher, 16 Nov 2016.

  1. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    28 Dec 2010
    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    304
    9 million children living in rural China have been abandoned by their parents, survey finds
    BY SHANGHAIIST IN NEWS ON NOV 14, 2016 3:25 PM


    Earlier last month we covered a touching tale about Liu Minghui and his younger sister making thousands of wontons a day at their grandparents' stall. The two siblings had been abandoned by their parents in Jiangxi province, a common occurrence in rural China:

    In China, Liu and his sister are one among many millions of liushou ertong (留守儿童), literally translated into "left behind children." They are the kids that have been left in the care of grandparents or no one at all, while their parents go to the cities to find jobs in order to support them. It's an impossible choice that millions of parents have been forced to make. While it has accelerated China's drive toward the future, it has also left millions of kids behind -- with mental health problems and thousands of wontons to make.Last week, China's Ministry of Civil Affairs released a survey of the number of left-behind children in rural China, providing a more detailed portrait of the amount of children living like Liu scattered throughout rural China in various levels of care.


    According to the survey, a total of 9.02 million Chinese children under the age of 16 were not under the direct care of their parents. Of those 9.02 million, 360,000 were not under the direct care of anyone at all.

    Read more: 9 million children living in rural China have been abandoned by their parents, survey finds: Shanghaiist

    This is a pretty good article. Let's hope the new government can make some changes. There are far to many 'left' behind children in China.
     
    Stamp likes this.
  2. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    26 Nov 2010
    Messages:
    9,827
    Likes Received:
    1,587
    :very sad
     
    Internationalteacher likes this.
  3. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    21 Feb 2011
    Messages:
    5,758
    Likes Received:
    726
    Very sad indeed.

    Sticking my neck out though do not think the problem is isolated to China. I do not have statistics but there are many children in Thailand whose parents either by choice or more realistically through necessity work in Bangkok. Without getting on my hobby horse... an economy centralised by the elite in one or two metropolises paired with an unequal distribution of wealth and parents are left with little or no choice.

    if interested read https://www.amazon.com/Injustice-Social-Inequality-Still-Persists/dp/1447320751

    It may be worth remembering that the situation in the UK is anything but rosy. What was once a derogatory term is now a social norm. The 'latch key kid' is a perfect storm of increased materialism, the emancipation of women, the breakdown of the 'standard family' and the centralisation of wealth by the one percent amongst other things. It's a bit old but BBC News - What's it like to be a latchkey child?

    Now with computers and tablets abound sometimes the parents are just an arms length away but still not with their children.


    Thanks for the story but tragically the picture is no better elsewhere
     
    Internationalteacher likes this.
  4. Gor Blimey Guvnur!

    Gor Blimey Guvnur! What the duck ! Staff Member

    Joined:
    19 Oct 2011
    Messages:
    2,170
    Likes Received:
    629
    Yep as BF says, going on everywhere in the world. In Thailand loads of kids don't live with their mom and dad for a multitude of reasons both positive and negative. Just in my small soi of 10 houses 3 kids are living with their grandparents ...it doesn't mean they are not well cared for.
    As for the 360,000 in OP yes sad, but in a country with a population of way over a billion it is probably similar per capita to that of many other countries ... I read a long time ago that it was a big problem in the US.
     
  5. DavidUSA

    DavidUSA την σκαφην σκαφην λεγοντας

    Joined:
    16 May 2014
    Messages:
    931
    Likes Received:
    415
    360,000 out of 9,000,000 is 4%.

    So 4% of Chinese kids have been abandoned, if the survey is representative of all of China. There is usually such a big difference between being raised by grandparents and being abandoned that I disagree with lumping those groups together.

    Having lived here for a while, one thing becomes clear: money is God. Chinese people need a boatload of money to get married, and they need money to go to the doctor. Education is expensive. If you want to get married, you need to have enough money to buy a house. That money will come from your family and from you. When grandpa, grandma, mom, or dad, get sick, you have to pay for it.

    The Money God is a ruthless taskmaster here. Not everything is rosy in China. A lot of people have big problems, and those problems often have money as a common ingredient.

    That China has child labor does not surprise me at all, but I have never seen it with my own eyes.

    On the other side of the coin, I see happy kids and hard-working moms and dads. My impression is that it is common for kids to be raised by their grandparents. Both mom and dad are working--that is normal. The average teacher in my school makes 16,200 Baht a month (converted). That is not a lot.

    There is an absence of spiritual values. Near where I live there are a lot of diamond shops. It seems that people buy diamonds in their spare time, like I take a walk and get a cup of coffee. How did the country get so rich? Everyone is working! By saying "a lot of diamond shops", I mean that there about about forty of them. Most are inside a luxury shopping center. So the goal of life is to get a hard rock, a kind of carbon, from the ground and cut the stone so you can wear it on a finger, ear, navel, wrist, or around your neck. The bigger the better. Everyone will see it because it is so shiny. You will be so happy. The meaning of life has been discovered. You can bask in it. No longer a peasant, you cannot beat having arrived at master. It's unarguable: two wontons are more than one, and you have twenty every day. The world is your wonton.

    As Flies to Wanton Boys
    Are We to the Gods
    They kill us for their sport.
    To sum this up, the Money God leaves people with meaningless lives. Collecting carbon has to get boring at some point. In China, a lot of people only know work, and that starts early, whether one is raised by birth-parents or not.
     
    Last edited: 16 Nov 2016
    Internationalteacher likes this.
  6. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    28 Dec 2010
    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    304
    ^China is certainly booming, but at a cost.

    Yes, it does happen in many countries... thanks for pointing that out.

    I work with many Chinese TA's that are not from Beijing. In fact, the majority of Chinese that I've befriended are not from Beijing. They are from neighboring provinces. The government urges people to move to the big cities because that is where the money is. Many of the Chinese come here to work and leave their families in other provinces because if they are not born in Beijing, they have to pay high fees to send their kids to school (public schools). They also have to pay fees for healthcare, etc. It is no surprise that there are many 'left behind' children and many of them do live with their grandparents as shown on the pie chart.
     
  7. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    28 Dec 2010
    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    304
    No, it doesn't, but as the article pointed out, there are many children living with no care at all at least in China.
     
  8. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    28 Dec 2010
    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    304
    What a great video with an even greater message. I know what you mean by latchkey kids.

    There are many parents that don't have time for their children. I see many children at my school who have Aiyi's that care for the children and pick them up after school. Many of the children don't see their parents much at all. I am often told that they are sad because their mom or dad is away from the city.

    I've been meaning to respond more here to what people have written, but it really has been a crazy work week.
     
    bahn_farang likes this.
  9. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    21 Feb 2011
    Messages:
    5,758
    Likes Received:
    726
    The crazy thing is, the hired help, so much looked down on, is charged with taking care of the most precious thing, our children. It, for me and my partner, is a crazy and short sighted economic to work so hard to provide for our children but employ someone who has little or no education.
     
    Internationalteacher likes this.
  10. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    28 Dec 2010
    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    304
    I hear you. Yes, there is a lot of money for some Chinese because there are more middle class than ever, but the divide between rich and poor is huge. I see all of these big, shiny, and expensive malls everywhere, but not many people shopping in them. Many people from the west think that things/goods/clothes etc. are cheap in China because everything is made here. That isn't the case. The prices are double to triple what you'd pay back home.

    Many average locals here don't make much more than 4000-6000 rmb a month and that isn't much. When you consider rents are quite high in the big cities, and the cost of living, 6000 rmb won't get you too far. How can locals afford to shop in these malls?

    The impact of the 'factory of the world' is also the high amount of pollution in many cities. The environment is of little care compared to the all mighty dollar.
     
    Last edited: 18 Nov 2016
    DavidUSA and bahn_farang like this.
  11. Internationalteacher

    Internationalteacher Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    28 Dec 2010
    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    304
    They may not be educated, but can they be trusted? I don't know.
    Most countries hire nannies that are from a lower strata and that doesn't mean that they can't all be trusted.
     
  12. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    21 Feb 2011
    Messages:
    5,758
    Likes Received:
    726
    Ah good point. My point was not about trust. My point was about the fact that many fathers and mothers go to work to 'better the lives of their children' or that's the justification that many use. This to us seems a little foolish. Why not stay home and use the 'superior': knowledge, education, vision, parental connection, love directly with your children? Not all families are fortunate to have the choice but some do.
     
    Internationalteacher likes this.

Share This Page